Argentina Olympic team robbed in Puebla – delegation chief

The Argentina Olympic team’s hotel rooms were broken into on Thursday night in Puebla, Mexico, and money and personal items were stolen, Argentina federation delegate Claudio “Chiqui” Tapia confirmed.

Argentina and Mexico’s Olympic football teams played to a 0-0 draw during a friendly in Puebla on Thursday night and Tapia said the players realized what had happened upon returning to the hotel postmatch.

“No one was hurt because no one was in the rooms at the time, but we realized there had been a robbery when we returned to the hotel from the stadium and now we are looking into finding out who was responsible for the crime,” Tapia said. “When we returned to the hotel to change for dinner we realized that everything was all messed up. We were missing personal items and money. Someone must be held responsible.”

Argentina had trained in the United States before traveling to Mexico for the friendly. They face Portugal, Algeria and Honduras in the group stage in Brazil, beginning Aug. 4. Defending Olympic champions Mexico open against Germany on Aug. 4 and compete in a group that also features Fiji and South Korea.

Justin Bieber almost performed at Republican convention event for $5 million

What would you do for $5 million? Or rather, what wouldn’t you do?

Turns out Justin Bieber would turn down a check that big if it meant performing at a Republican National Convention event.

According to TMZ, the Canadian singer missed out on what could have been his “biggest single payday,” and was told by organizers that if he were to perform, it would be not be a political endorsement.

The performance funds were raised by donors who were willing to pay up front, as well as to foot the production costs.

Bieber allegedly sought council from none other than Cleveland hero LeBron James, who urged the singer not to attend. As TMZ reported it:

Our sources say the promoter told Scooter … LeBron James himself was also going to attend an event in Cleveland, welcoming the GOP without taking a political stand. The sources tell us Justin’s people got in touch with LeBron’s people, and they were told LeBron would actually not be in Cleveland for the convention and urged Justin not to go as well.

The report says that Bieber’s manager, Scooter Braun, who has campaigned and fundraised on behalf of Hillary Clinton, said he would drop Bieber as a client if he went through with the gig.

Braun also apparently talked about putting a “Black Lives Matter” banner on stage during the performance, but was told by donors he could only display an “All Lives Matter” sign. Apparently Bieber’s band didn’t want to do the show either.

It seems Bieber knows that loving yourself is more important than $5 mil.

Tiny Caravans Replace Rooms at This Berlin Hotel

Design lovers looking for unique vacation lodging: add this camper hotel in Berlin, Germany to your bucket list, stat. Located in the hip, artsy neighborhood of Neukölln, the Huettenpalast Hotel brings camping indoors with quirky caravans and wooden huts. Founders Silke Lorenzen and Sarah Vollmer built the hotel in a former vacuum cleaner factory, taking advantage of the large factory windows and open spaces to think outside the box. There are 12 different campers available for nightly rentals, each renovated and then decorated with kitschy-chic vintage items and an eye towards sustainability.

The campers sit in a wide-open communal room outfitted with tables, chairs, and a lounge area. Most are small and only sleep 1 to 2 people, but the reasonable prices (around 69 euros per night, depending on which one you choose) also include breakfast, free wireless, and separate shower and bathroom facilities. The Huettenpalast also boasts six traditional hotel rooms and a garden that was once the storage space for the old factory. The room-within-a-room design is reminiscent of many European hostels, but the Huettenpalast’s playfulness makes this hotel a step above other budget options.

The

The “Kleine Schwester” caravan is a classic design from the 1970s.

The interior of the “Kleine Schwester” caravan features a wooden mosaic and a “hat” so that visitors can stand up straight.

The “Schwalbennest” is a West German caravan from the 1960s that used to sleep 5. It can now host three on two separate beds.

The interior of the “Herzensbrecher” caravan, a camper built in 1959 in Dresden.

The Alter Palast uses wooden panels from the former factory and can sleep up to four people with two beds inside and two people on the roof.

The 1950s “Puck” camper features a restored vintage design and room for two.

Turkey: Independent monitors must be allowed to access detainees amid torture allegations

Amnesty International has gathered credible evidence that detainees in Turkey are being subjected to beatings and torture, including rape, in official and unofficial detention centres in the country.

The organization is calling for independent monitors to be given immediate access to detainees in all facilities in the wake of the coup attempt, which include police headquarters, sports centres and courthouses. More than 10,000 people have been detained since the failed coup.

Amnesty International has credible reports that Turkish police in Ankara and Istanbul are holding detainees in stress positions for up to 48 hours, denying them food, water and medical treatment, and verbally abusing and threatening them. In the worst cases some have been subjected to severe beatings and torture, including rape.

“Reports of abuse including beatings and rape in detention are extremely alarming, especially given the scale of detentions that we have seen in the past week. The grim details that we have documented are just a snapshot of the abuses that might be happening in places of detention,” said Amnesty International’s Europe director John Dalhuisen.

“It is absolutely imperative that the Turkish authorities halt these abhorrent practices and allow international monitors to visit all these detainees in the places they are being held.”

It is absolutely imperative that the Turkish authorities halt these abhorrent practices and allow international monitors to visit all these detainees in the places they are being held
John Dalhuisen, Europe Director

Detainees are being arbitrarily held, including in informal places of detention. They have been denied access to lawyers and family members and have not been properly informed of the charges against them, undermining their right to a fair trial.

On Saturday the Turkish government issued its first decree under new powers authorised by its declaration of a state of emergency. The decree dramatically increases the amount of time detainees can be held without being charged from four to 30 days.

The change risks exposing detainees to further torture and other ill-treatment. The decree also provides for officials to observe or even record meetings between pre-trial detainees and lawyers, and detainees are restricted in who they can choose to represent them, further undermining the right to a fair trial.

Torture and other ill-treatment

Amnesty International spoke to lawyers, doctors and a person on duty in a detention facility about the conditions detainees were being held in.

The organization heard multiple reports of detainees being held in unofficial locations such as sports centres and a stable. Some detainees, including at least three judges, were held in the corridors of courthouses.

All of the interviewees wished to remain anonymous for security reasons. The organization heard extremely alarming accounts of torture and other ill-treatment of detainees, particularly at the Ankara Police Headquarters sports hall, Ankara Başkent sports hall and the riding club stables there.

According to these accounts, police held detainees in stress positions, denied them food, water and medical treatment, verbally abused and threatened them and subjected them to beatings and torture, including rape and sexual assault.

Two lawyers in Ankara working on behalf of detainees told Amnesty International that detainees said they witnessed senior military officers in detention being raped with a truncheon or finger by police officers.

A person on duty at the Ankara Police Headquarters sports hall saw a detainee with severe wounds consistent with having been beaten, including a large swelling on his head. The detainee could not stand up or focus his eyes and he eventually lost consciousness. While in some cases detainees were afforded limited medical assistance, police refused to allow this detainee essential medical treatment despite his severe injuries. The interviewee heard one police doctor on duty say: “Let him die. We will say he came to us dead.”

The same interviewee said 650-800 male soldiers were being held in the Ankara police headquarters sports hall. At least 300 of the detainees showed signs of having been beaten. Some detainees had visible bruises, cuts, or broken bones. Around 40 were so badly injured they could not walk. Two were unable to stand. One woman who was also detained in a separate facility there had bruising on her face and torso.

The interviewee also heard police officers make statements indicating that they were responsible for the beatings, and that detainees were being beaten so that “they would talk”.

In general, it appears that the worst treatment in detention was reserved for higher-ranking military officers.

Many of the detainees in the sports hall and other facilities were handcuffed behind their backs with plastic zip-ties and forced to kneel for hours. Interviewees reported that zip-ties were often fastened too tight and left wounds on the arms of detainees. In some cases detainees were also blindfolded throughout their detention.

Lawyers described how people were brought before prosecutors for interrogation with their shirts covered in blood.

Interviewees also said that based on what detainees told them police deprived them of food for up to three days and water for up to two days.

One lawyer working at the Caglayan Courthouse in Istanbul said that some of the detainees she saw there were in extreme emotional distress, with one detainee attempting to throw himself out of a sixth story window and another repeatedly slamming his head against the wall.

Failing to condemn ill-treatment or torture in these circumstances is tantamount to condoning it — John Dalhuisen

“Despite chilling images and videos of torture that have been widely broadcast across the country, the government has remained conspicuously silent on the abuse. Failing to condemn ill-treatment or torture in these circumstances is tantamount to condoning it,” said John Dalhuisen.

Arbitrary detention and absence of due process

Amnesty International interviewed more than 10 lawyers in both Ankara and Istanbul who gave information about the conditions of their clients’ confinement. The lawyers represented up to 18 detainees each. The vast majority of clients were low ranking military personnel, including many conscripts. Some were judges, prosecutors, police, and other civil servants. Detainees were primarily men and were as young as 20.

The accounts of lawyers, who spoke on condition of anonymity, were strikingly similar.

All the lawyers said that in the majority of the cases detainees were held pre-charge for four or more days by the police. With very few exceptions, their clients were being held incommunicado throughout this period and had not been able to inform their families of where they were or what was happening to them.

They were also not able to phone a lawyer and in most cases did not see their lawyers until shortly before being brought to court or being interrogated by prosecutors. One lawyer told Amnesty International that when she finally saw her clients, “[They] gave me the contact information [for their families] so I could call them. The families knew nothing. They were happy to hear their sons were alive.”

Amnesty International spoke with a relative of a high-ranking military official who was detained in Ankara. He said that family members were able to speak with the detained relative on his mobile phone on Saturday 16 July before it was confiscated by the police, but that the family has had no information about his fate or whereabouts since then. Family members made several trips to detention centres in Ankara but were consistently told the detainee was not there. The detainee has also had no access to a lawyer. Such treatment amounts to enforced disappearance which in itself is a crime under international law. This practice places detainees outside the protection of the law and cuts them off from the outside world, putting them at very high risk of torture or even extrajudicial execution.

The lawyers told Amnesty International that in most cases neither they nor their clients were informed of the specific charges against them, either in a charge sheet or in court, making it difficult to prepare a defence. Soldiers who had been detained were brought to court in groups as large as 20 and 25 people. One lawyer described trying to defend his client in the current environment as “trying to find something with the lights off”.

Only one of the detainees represented by lawyers who spoke to Amnesty International was able to choose her own lawyer. According to the other interviewees, private lawyers were not allowed to represent detainees, who were all assigned bar association legal aid lawyers. The detainees’ access to their lawyers was also limited. Lawyers told Amnesty International that after the hearings they were not allowed to speak to their clients who were remanded in pre-trial detention.

Turkey is understandably concerned with public security at the moment, but no circumstances can ever justify torture and other ill-treatment or arbitrary detention
John Dalhuisen

“These are grave violations of the right to a fair trial which is enshrined in both Turkey’s national law and international law,” said John Dalhuisen.

“Turkey is understandably concerned with public security at the moment, but no circumstances can ever justify torture and other ill-treatment or arbitrary detention. The climate in Turkey right now is one of fear and shock. The government must steer the country on the path to respect for rights and law, not engage in retribution.”

Information provided to Amnesty International by lawyers reflected that many detainees were being held arbitrarily. In the vast majority of cases, they said that no evidence establishing reasonable suspicion of criminal behaviour was presented against their clients during the charge hearings; and the hearing did not establish that there were permissible reasons for detention pending trial.

Instead, lawyers explained that judges ordered detained soldiers to be placed in pre-trial detention if they left their barracks the evening of the coup, regardless of the reason. In one case, a detainee who appeared before the court was not asked a single question by the judge at her hearing.

Some of the questioning by judges was entirely irrelevant to the events of the coup attempt, and appeared intended to establish any link to Fethullah Gülen or institutions sympathetic to him.

Authorities accuse Gülen of masterminding the coup attempt, which he has denied.

Lawyers explained that detainees were remanded in pre-trial detention even without a finding that a detainee was a flight risk or that there was a risk a detainee would tamper with evidence, as is legally required.

Detaining people in connection with a criminal charge without demonstrating that you have evidence of criminal wrongdoing is by definition arbitrary and unlawful
John Dalhuisen

“Detaining people in connection with a criminal charge without demonstrating that you have evidence of criminal wrongdoing is by definition arbitrary and unlawful,” said John Dalhuisen.

“These highly irregular, and seemingly systematic practices, must be investigated.”

Recommendations

Amnesty International urges the European Committee for the Prevention of Torture (CPT) to conduct an emergency visit to Turkey to monitor conditions of detention. As a member of the Council of Europe, the Turkish government has an obligation to cooperate with the CPT. The CPT is the only independent body authorized to conduct ad hoc visits to all places of detention in Turkey at the time of their choosing.

The National Human Rights Institution of Turkey, which had access to detention facilities in the country to monitor conditions of detention, was abolished in April 2016 leaving no institution in the country with this mandate. In the current environment, in which thousands of detainees are being held incommunicado, without access to lawyers or relatives, for lengthy pre-charge periods, in irregular detention centres and amid allegations of torture and other ill-treatment, it is vital that monitors are allowed access.

Amnesty International urges the Turkish authorities to adhere to their obligations under international human rights law and not to abuse the state of emergency by trampling on the rights of detainees
John Dalhuisen

“Amnesty International urges the Turkish authorities to adhere to their obligations under international human rights law and not to abuse the state of emergency by trampling on the rights of detainees,” said John Dalhuisen.

“The prohibition of torture is absolute and can never be compromised or suspended.”

Amnesty International urges the Turkish authorities to condemn torture and other ill-treatment in places of detention, and take concrete steps to combat it and hold perpetrators accountable.

Authorities should ensure bar associations and family members are notified of detentions without delay and that lawyers have unimpeded access to their clients at all stages of detention.

MICHAEL JORDAN: ‘I CAN NO LONGER STAY SILENT’

His statement on the shootings of African-Americans and the targeting of police officers

As a proud American, a father who lost his own dad in a senseless act of violence, and a black man, I have been deeply troubled by the deaths of African-Americans at the hands of law enforcement and angered by the cowardly and hateful targeting and killing of police officers. I grieve with the families who have lost loved ones, as I know their pain all too well.

Michael Jordan speaks to the media as Charlotte Hornets announce the 2017 All-Star game at the Time Warner Cable Arena on June 23, 2015 in Charlotte, North Carolina.

“I was raised by parents who taught me to love and respect people regardless of their race or background, so I am saddened and frustrated by the divisive rhetoric and racial tensions that seem to be getting worse as of late. I know this country is better than that, and I can no longer stay silent. We need to find solutions that ensure people of color receive fair and equal treatment AND that police officers – who put their lives on the line every day to protect us all – are respected and supported.

“Over the past three decades I have seen up close the dedication of the law enforcement officers who protect me and my family. I have the greatest respect for their sacrifice and service. I also recognize that for many people of color their experiences with law enforcement have been different than mine. I have decided to speak out in the hope that we can come together as Americans, and through peaceful dialogue and education, achieve constructive change.

“To support that effort, I am making contributions of $1 million each to two organizations, the International Association of Chiefs of Police’s newly established Institute for Community-Police Relations and the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. The Institute for Community-Police Relations’ policy and oversight work is focused on building trust and promoting best practices in community policing. My donation to the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, the nation’s oldest civil rights law organization, will support its ongoing work in support of reforms that will build trust and respect between communities and law enforcement. Although I know these contributions alone are not enough to solve the problem, I hope the resources will help both organizations make a positive difference.

“We are privileged to live in the world’s greatest country – a country that has provided my family and me the greatest of opportunities. The problems we face didn’t happen overnight and they won’t be solved tomorrow, but if we all work together, we can foster greater understanding, positive change and create a more peaceful world for ourselves, our children, our families and our communities.”

Material Inspiration: 10 Projects Inspired by Wood

To celebrate the launch of ArchDaily Materials, our new product catalog, we’ve rounded up 10 awesome projects from around the world that were inspired by one material: wood. Check out the projects after the break…

Saint Benedict Chapel / Peter Zumthor

An expressive roof and solid base make up this wooden chapel in Switzerland, where minimalist wood columns, beams and benches showcase Zumthor’s craftsmanship and his delicate approach to material and detail. It is a building that showcases simplicity, beauty, and a human scale.

Makoko Floating School / NLE Architects

Located in the coastal community of Makoko, a slum neighborhood off the Lagos Lagoon in Lagos, Nigeria, this floating school uses wood as the structure, support and finishing for the completed school. The overall design is composed of a triangular A-Frame section where the second tier houses the classrooms.

Orquideorama / Plan B Architects + 

This outdoor sanctuary in Colombia aimed to unify the natural and artificial, creating a material and spatial organization that is deeply related to the processes of life. Wood is used to make micro scale ”hexagonal modules” that attach to a steel structure.

Winnipeg Skating Shelters / Patkau Architects

Canadian project that makes shelters of thin, flexible plywood, which gives both structure and spatial character through bending/deformation. These shelters help protect skaters from harsh winter winds.

Flederhaus / Heri & Salli

Flederhaus is a vertical public space in Austria that serves as an oasis of relaxation. Wood is used to create steps and platforms that lead to a series of hammocks. It’s an area where one is meant to come in and hang out.

Archery Hall & Boxing Club / FT Architects

Found on the campus of Kogakuin University in west Tokyo, Japan, these two buildings use locally sourced timber to provide accessible and inspiring spaces for the students. Timber, a historical material, has been reanalyzed and transformed into a new building material that emphasizes the stark transparency of the void below.

RAKVERE Summer Theater / Kadarik Tüür Arhitektid

The main design goal of this Estonian theater was to create a closed, comfortable and intimate space that forms an immediate connection with the audience and the actors. The light wooden construction gives space and allows for dynamic stage lighting; after the 12 performances the stage will be dismantled and the timber and boards re-used for other projects.

Boathouse / 

A renovated boathouse in Norway, this project utilizes Norwegian pine exterior cladding impregnated with a by-product from the sugar cane industry, which gives it a grey patina. The honest use of material inspired the new building.

Sunset Cabin / Taylor Smyth Architects

This cabin in Ontario, Canada is encased on three sides by cedar slats; all interior surfaces, including floor and ceiling, are fabricated of birch veneer plywood. The clients desired a private retreat from the main cottage further up the hill that would also enhance their enjoyment of the surrounding landscape in a location previously used to watch the sunset.

Tverrfjellhytta / Snøhetta

The Norwegian Wild Reindeer Centre Pavilion is located on the outskirts of Dovrefjell National Park in Norway. The building design is based on a rigid outer shell and an organic inner core, where digital 3D-models were used to drive the milling machines for the interior. Norwegian shipbuilders in Hardangerfjord created the organic shape from 10 inch square pine timber beams. The wood was then assembled in a traditional way using only wood pegs as fasteners.

Putin’s Cronies Helped Russian Mafia In Spain, Prosecutors Say: Report

Vladimir Putin
Russian President Vladimir Putin attends a session of the Civic Chamber at the Kremlin in Moscow, Russia, on June 23, 2015.

One of Russia’s largest mafias operated out of Spain for more than a decade with help from some of Russian President Vladimir Putin’s cronies, prosecutors in Madrid said.

A 488-page complaint to the Central Court obtained by Bloomberg News alleged direct links between Moscow officials and the St. Petersburg-based crime organization Tambrov, which allegedly moved into Spain in 1996 to launder profits from its criminal activities.

The complaint was the culmination of a decade-long probe into the spread of Russian organized crime under Putin’s rule. Prosecutors Juan Carrau and Jose Grinda have formally requested the court to charge 27 people with money laundering, fraud and other crimes.

The document draws links between Gennady Petrov, the alleged leader of the criminal enterprise, and some of Putin’s oldest allies such as Russian Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Kozak and Viktor Zubkov, the chairman of gas exporter Gazprom.

The Russian president himself is mentioned three times in the complaint. But Vladislav Reznik is the only Russian official facing possible charges, according to Bloomberg News.

Reznik, a member of Putin’s ruling United Russia party and the deputy head of the State Duma finance committee, allegedly helped Petrov get his associates appointed to key positions in Moscow in return for assets in Spain.

Prosecutors are looking to seize a property the Russian lawmaker apparently owns on the resort island of Majorca. However, Reznik said his relationship with Petrov is “purely social” and would welcome a trial in Spain as an opportunity to clear his name, Bloomberg News reported.

Prosecutors said Petrov, a Russian businessman with Spanish residency, used his network of political and judicial contacts in Moscow to help him carry out criminal dealings from Spain, including murder, drug smuggling, arms trafficking, fraud and extortion.

An attorney for Petrov, Roberto Mazorriaga, told Bloomberg News that prosecutors have not yet provided any evidence to support their accusations against the alleged mafia boss.

“The Petrov probe could change the narrative of Putin in the West — from being a Stalinist tyrant defending the interest of his country to being a product of gangster Petersburg who united authorities with organized crime,” Stanislav Belkovsky, a Kremlin adviser during Putin’s first term who consults at the Institute for National Strategy in Moscow, told Bloomberg News Monday.

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