No one parties like the son of ‘El Chapo’

Ivan Guzman is definitely his father’s son.

Ivan Guzman, a son of the infamous drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, lives life to the fullest, as his Twitter account shows.Image via Twitter Photo: Twitter

The child of the infamous drug lord Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman knows how to live it up, as his Twitter account shows.

Ivan Guzman, a son of the infamous drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, lives life to the fullest, as his Twitter account shows.Image via Twitter Photo: Twitter

Ivan Guzman Archibaldo, 33, lives a life full of guns, expensive cars, partying in the ocean and being surrounded by women, according to the pictures he’s posted online.

Ivan Guzman, a son of the infamous drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, lives life to the fullest, as his Twitter account shows.Image via Twitter Photo: Twitter

The Spanish website Blog del Narco shows El Chapo’s son in even more extravagant photos, with lion cubs in a Mercedes-Benz and stacks of money with guns on top of them.

Ivan Guzman, a son of the infamous drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, lives life to the fullest, as his Twitter account shows.Image via Twitter Photo: Twitter

It appears he’s since taken the photos down from his Twitter page and other social media accounts.

Ivan Guzman, a son of the infamous drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, lives life to the fullest, as his Twitter account shows.Image via Twitter Photo: Twitter

According to Bolg del Narco, Guzman and his siblings received everything from “helicopters to submachine (guns) bathed in gold” growing up, after seeing people tortured in his home and having nightmares.

Ivan Guzman, a son of the infamous drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, lives life to the fullest, as his Twitter account shows.Image via Twitter Photo: Twitter

Since his father’s arrest, Guzman vows to continue the family business. On Jan. 10, he tweeted in Spanish, “Nothing changes here, we will continue to work.”

Ivan Guzman, a son of the infamous drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, lives life to the fullest, as his Twitter account shows.Image via Twitter Photo: Twitter

Guzman was believed to be abducted with his younger brother, Jesus Alfredo Guzman Salazar, 30, in Puerto Vallarta, but it turned out only El Chapo’s youngest son had been taken. He was eventually freed and is reportedly well.

Ivan Guzman, a son of the infamous drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, lives life to the fullest, as his Twitter account shows.Image via Twitter Photo: Twitter

Both of El Chapo’s sons have been implicated in their father’s drug-trafficking organization and are assumed to take on larger roles in the cartel since their father’s arrest.

Ivan Guzman, a son of the infamous drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, lives life to the fullest, as his Twitter account shows.Image via Twitter Photo: Twitter

Whether they meet the same fate as their father remains to be seen. For now, El Chapo’s sons are partying like there’s no tomorrow.

Canadian Fishermen Caught Fabled 650-Pound, Century-Old Sturgeon

Nicknamed “Pig Nose,” the fish was quickly released back into the wild

For decades, an enormous sturgeon known as “Pig Nose” has eluded fishermen in British Columbia. Named for its stubby nose, lopped off at the tip at some point during its long life, the massive sturgeon was a dream catch for fishermen up and down the Fraser River. Now, after decades of avoiding hooks and lures, a group of fishermen finally reeled the enormous beast out of the depths, Cara Giamo reports for Atlas Obscura.

 Nick McCabe is a tour guide with River Monster Adventures, a company based out of Lillooet, B.C. that specializes in taking fishermen on trips up and down the Fraser River searching for sturgeon. It’s been decades since the last time Pig Nose was sighted, but earlier this week, McCabe and a tour group nabbed the enormous fish. After two hours of struggling, they finally wrangled Pig Nose out of the deep waters. The legendary fish is more than 10 feet long and weighs 650 pounds.“We’re walking on clouds,” Jeff Grimolfson, another guide with River Monster Adventures, tells Erika Tucker for Global News. “This fish has been the talk of fishing and sporting goods shops for years.”

pig nose 2
“Pig Nose” got its name from its identifying injury, which sheared off the tip of its nose sometime during the last 40 years. (River Monster Adventures)

It might seem crazy, but at one point it was a fairly common sight for sailors and fishermen in North America to spot giant sturgeon swimming up and down rivers. Relics of prehistoric eras, sturgeon have been around since the days of the dinosaurs, according to the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.While they might look a bit like smooth-skinned sharks, sturgeon are bottom-feeders that scrape riverbeds and lake bottoms with their snouts. It’s common for them to live about 60 years, and at one point fishermen throughout Canada and the United States often spotted 100-year-old sturgeon as they traveled up and down the rivers of the New World.Early on, sturgeon were so plentiful throughout North America that they were a common sight in fishing boats and on dinner plates. In New York’s Hudson River Valley, where three of the world’s 26 species of sturgeon are found, the fish were so ubiquitous that it was nicknamed “Albany Beef” after the state capital. They often grow to be about 10 feet long and can weigh an average of 100 pounds, so a single fish meant a lot of meat.The sturgeon’s long life, however, means it also takes a long time for them to reach sexual maturity. It can take the big fish about 20 years to start mating, so their population can rapidly dwindle. Between overfishing and increases in traffic and pollution, some sturgeon species were pushed to the brink of extinction. Many species are now protected throughout the United States and Canada.Luckily for Pig Nose, all of River Monster Adventures’ sturgeon-fishing trips are catch-and-release. After posing for a few photos and having its measurements taken, the giant sturgeon was sent back into Fraser River to await the next hook.

 

What’s next for Mexico’s drug cartels after El Chapo

As Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman awaitsextradition to the United States, he leaves behind what appears to be a new landscape for Mexico’s drug cartels.

Last week, his son, Jesus Alfredo Guzman, was kidnapped by men authorities believe were members of a rival cartel. Sources tell CNN he was released Saturday, but his abduction signals that the game of thrones for Mexico’s next top drug cartel has already begun.

Here’s what you need to know about the power vacuum and the key players:

Jesus Alfredo Guzman, who was kidnapped August 15, was allegedly groomed to take the reins of the Sinaloa cartel his father ran — except he’s got a bit of a party-boy reputation. A senior Mexican law enforcement told CNN, “(The kidnapping) is an important development because it affects the power structure of the Sinaloa cartel. (El Chapo’s) son was supposed to be part of the new leadership,” alleging that he wasn’t taking the role seriously. While the kidnapping doesn’t dismantle the Sinaloa cartel, it was considered a blow to the existing power structure.

Turf war: Sinaloa Federation vs. Jalisco New Generation?

Six men were abducted from a posh restaurant in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, on August 15. One of them was drug lord El Chapo's son.

Jalisco New Generation, the group allegedly responsible for the kidnapping, is one of the fastest growing cartels and has been actively fighting to gain control of Sinaloa territory in Tijuana and Baja California, according to the Los Angeles Times. A report by the State Department noted a “consistent increase of activity involving rival cartels, specifically Cartel Jalisco Nueva Generacion in Baja California.” Jalisco New Generation first began in 2011 as the armed unit within the Sinaloa cartel, allegedly murdering 35 Zetas members.

Attacks becoming more personal

One of the gunmen who carried out the early morning kidnapping.

One of the gunmen who carried out the early morning kidnapping.

Since El Chapo’s second capture, rival cartels have directly targeted family members who previously would have been off-limits. Earlier this summer, 150 assailants ransacked the home of Guzman’s 86-year-old mother in the family’s hometown of La Tuna, The Guardian reported. While his mother wasn’t harmed, three people reportedly died in the attack. “I can’t imagine anyone doing this while he was active,” biographer Malcolm Beith told The Guardian. According to NPR, two nephews on his wife’s side were also allegedly killed in a separate incident this summer.

Violence could get worse

Eighty thousand people were killed at the height of the drug wars between 2006 and 2015, theCongressional Research Service (CRS) found. While the government no longer collects data on deaths related specifically to organized crime, “the rate of all homicides in Mexico has declined by 30 percent” between 2012 to 2015, according to a report by the CRS. But a 30% drop in the murder rate does not mean violence has stopped. Journalists are still missing, local business owners are still threatened, extortion still occurs. Analysts say the power vacuum could lead to more chaos as stability weakens.

In April, the US State Department issued a travel warning cautioning Americans in Baja California to be careful. “Tijuana and Rosarito continued to experience an increase in homicide rates from January to October 2015 compared to the same period in the previous year,” the warning said, citing the Baja State Secretariat for Public Security. Many of these killings appear to be “targeted criminal organization assassinations,” but the State Department warned also of “turf battles” that could break out in areas frequented by US citizens.

The fight for territory and power.

Although power dynamics among cartels are always shifting, the US Drug Enforcement Administration names six other major cartels, not including Sinaloa, that were powerful in recent years as of July 2015: Los Zetas, Tijuana/AFO, Juárez/CFO, Beltrán Leyva, Gulf, and La Familia Michoacana. According to the DEA, these groups alone are likely to have splintered off into nine or as many as 20 other groups.

What about drug trade into US?

The trafficking of heroin, marijuana, cocaine and meth into the United States from Mexico is an annual $19 to 20 billion industry, according to a Department of Homeland Security report. And the Sinaloa cartel has traditionally held a dominant share of that, thanks to Guzman’s sophisticated business strategies and Sinaloa’s control of trafficking routes. But even if the head of the snake is removed, the drugs continue to flow. A Customs and Border Protection report that analyzed seizure data along the border between 2009 and 2010 found that “the removal of key personnel does not have a discernable impact on drug flows” into the US.
Even El Chapo is aware that drug trafficking won’t end once he’s gone. “The day I don’t exist, it’s not going to decrease in any way at all,” he told Sean Penn in an interview recorded during his last escape from prison.

Argentina Olympic team robbed in Puebla – delegation chief

The Argentina Olympic team’s hotel rooms were broken into on Thursday night in Puebla, Mexico, and money and personal items were stolen, Argentina federation delegate Claudio “Chiqui” Tapia confirmed.

Argentina and Mexico’s Olympic football teams played to a 0-0 draw during a friendly in Puebla on Thursday night and Tapia said the players realized what had happened upon returning to the hotel postmatch.

“No one was hurt because no one was in the rooms at the time, but we realized there had been a robbery when we returned to the hotel from the stadium and now we are looking into finding out who was responsible for the crime,” Tapia said. “When we returned to the hotel to change for dinner we realized that everything was all messed up. We were missing personal items and money. Someone must be held responsible.”

Argentina had trained in the United States before traveling to Mexico for the friendly. They face Portugal, Algeria and Honduras in the group stage in Brazil, beginning Aug. 4. Defending Olympic champions Mexico open against Germany on Aug. 4 and compete in a group that also features Fiji and South Korea.

Justin Bieber almost performed at Republican convention event for $5 million

What would you do for $5 million? Or rather, what wouldn’t you do?

Turns out Justin Bieber would turn down a check that big if it meant performing at a Republican National Convention event.

According to TMZ, the Canadian singer missed out on what could have been his “biggest single payday,” and was told by organizers that if he were to perform, it would be not be a political endorsement.

The performance funds were raised by donors who were willing to pay up front, as well as to foot the production costs.

Bieber allegedly sought council from none other than Cleveland hero LeBron James, who urged the singer not to attend. As TMZ reported it:

Our sources say the promoter told Scooter … LeBron James himself was also going to attend an event in Cleveland, welcoming the GOP without taking a political stand. The sources tell us Justin’s people got in touch with LeBron’s people, and they were told LeBron would actually not be in Cleveland for the convention and urged Justin not to go as well.

The report says that Bieber’s manager, Scooter Braun, who has campaigned and fundraised on behalf of Hillary Clinton, said he would drop Bieber as a client if he went through with the gig.

Braun also apparently talked about putting a “Black Lives Matter” banner on stage during the performance, but was told by donors he could only display an “All Lives Matter” sign. Apparently Bieber’s band didn’t want to do the show either.

It seems Bieber knows that loving yourself is more important than $5 mil.

Tiny Caravans Replace Rooms at This Berlin Hotel

Design lovers looking for unique vacation lodging: add this camper hotel in Berlin, Germany to your bucket list, stat. Located in the hip, artsy neighborhood of Neukölln, the Huettenpalast Hotel brings camping indoors with quirky caravans and wooden huts. Founders Silke Lorenzen and Sarah Vollmer built the hotel in a former vacuum cleaner factory, taking advantage of the large factory windows and open spaces to think outside the box. There are 12 different campers available for nightly rentals, each renovated and then decorated with kitschy-chic vintage items and an eye towards sustainability.

The campers sit in a wide-open communal room outfitted with tables, chairs, and a lounge area. Most are small and only sleep 1 to 2 people, but the reasonable prices (around 69 euros per night, depending on which one you choose) also include breakfast, free wireless, and separate shower and bathroom facilities. The Huettenpalast also boasts six traditional hotel rooms and a garden that was once the storage space for the old factory. The room-within-a-room design is reminiscent of many European hostels, but the Huettenpalast’s playfulness makes this hotel a step above other budget options.

The

The “Kleine Schwester” caravan is a classic design from the 1970s.

The interior of the “Kleine Schwester” caravan features a wooden mosaic and a “hat” so that visitors can stand up straight.

The “Schwalbennest” is a West German caravan from the 1960s that used to sleep 5. It can now host three on two separate beds.

The interior of the “Herzensbrecher” caravan, a camper built in 1959 in Dresden.

The Alter Palast uses wooden panels from the former factory and can sleep up to four people with two beds inside and two people on the roof.

The 1950s “Puck” camper features a restored vintage design and room for two.

Turkey: Independent monitors must be allowed to access detainees amid torture allegations

Amnesty International has gathered credible evidence that detainees in Turkey are being subjected to beatings and torture, including rape, in official and unofficial detention centres in the country.

The organization is calling for independent monitors to be given immediate access to detainees in all facilities in the wake of the coup attempt, which include police headquarters, sports centres and courthouses. More than 10,000 people have been detained since the failed coup.

Amnesty International has credible reports that Turkish police in Ankara and Istanbul are holding detainees in stress positions for up to 48 hours, denying them food, water and medical treatment, and verbally abusing and threatening them. In the worst cases some have been subjected to severe beatings and torture, including rape.

“Reports of abuse including beatings and rape in detention are extremely alarming, especially given the scale of detentions that we have seen in the past week. The grim details that we have documented are just a snapshot of the abuses that might be happening in places of detention,” said Amnesty International’s Europe director John Dalhuisen.

“It is absolutely imperative that the Turkish authorities halt these abhorrent practices and allow international monitors to visit all these detainees in the places they are being held.”

It is absolutely imperative that the Turkish authorities halt these abhorrent practices and allow international monitors to visit all these detainees in the places they are being held
John Dalhuisen, Europe Director

Detainees are being arbitrarily held, including in informal places of detention. They have been denied access to lawyers and family members and have not been properly informed of the charges against them, undermining their right to a fair trial.

On Saturday the Turkish government issued its first decree under new powers authorised by its declaration of a state of emergency. The decree dramatically increases the amount of time detainees can be held without being charged from four to 30 days.

The change risks exposing detainees to further torture and other ill-treatment. The decree also provides for officials to observe or even record meetings between pre-trial detainees and lawyers, and detainees are restricted in who they can choose to represent them, further undermining the right to a fair trial.

Torture and other ill-treatment

Amnesty International spoke to lawyers, doctors and a person on duty in a detention facility about the conditions detainees were being held in.

The organization heard multiple reports of detainees being held in unofficial locations such as sports centres and a stable. Some detainees, including at least three judges, were held in the corridors of courthouses.

All of the interviewees wished to remain anonymous for security reasons. The organization heard extremely alarming accounts of torture and other ill-treatment of detainees, particularly at the Ankara Police Headquarters sports hall, Ankara Başkent sports hall and the riding club stables there.

According to these accounts, police held detainees in stress positions, denied them food, water and medical treatment, verbally abused and threatened them and subjected them to beatings and torture, including rape and sexual assault.

Two lawyers in Ankara working on behalf of detainees told Amnesty International that detainees said they witnessed senior military officers in detention being raped with a truncheon or finger by police officers.

A person on duty at the Ankara Police Headquarters sports hall saw a detainee with severe wounds consistent with having been beaten, including a large swelling on his head. The detainee could not stand up or focus his eyes and he eventually lost consciousness. While in some cases detainees were afforded limited medical assistance, police refused to allow this detainee essential medical treatment despite his severe injuries. The interviewee heard one police doctor on duty say: “Let him die. We will say he came to us dead.”

The same interviewee said 650-800 male soldiers were being held in the Ankara police headquarters sports hall. At least 300 of the detainees showed signs of having been beaten. Some detainees had visible bruises, cuts, or broken bones. Around 40 were so badly injured they could not walk. Two were unable to stand. One woman who was also detained in a separate facility there had bruising on her face and torso.

The interviewee also heard police officers make statements indicating that they were responsible for the beatings, and that detainees were being beaten so that “they would talk”.

In general, it appears that the worst treatment in detention was reserved for higher-ranking military officers.

Many of the detainees in the sports hall and other facilities were handcuffed behind their backs with plastic zip-ties and forced to kneel for hours. Interviewees reported that zip-ties were often fastened too tight and left wounds on the arms of detainees. In some cases detainees were also blindfolded throughout their detention.

Lawyers described how people were brought before prosecutors for interrogation with their shirts covered in blood.

Interviewees also said that based on what detainees told them police deprived them of food for up to three days and water for up to two days.

One lawyer working at the Caglayan Courthouse in Istanbul said that some of the detainees she saw there were in extreme emotional distress, with one detainee attempting to throw himself out of a sixth story window and another repeatedly slamming his head against the wall.

Failing to condemn ill-treatment or torture in these circumstances is tantamount to condoning it — John Dalhuisen

“Despite chilling images and videos of torture that have been widely broadcast across the country, the government has remained conspicuously silent on the abuse. Failing to condemn ill-treatment or torture in these circumstances is tantamount to condoning it,” said John Dalhuisen.

Arbitrary detention and absence of due process

Amnesty International interviewed more than 10 lawyers in both Ankara and Istanbul who gave information about the conditions of their clients’ confinement. The lawyers represented up to 18 detainees each. The vast majority of clients were low ranking military personnel, including many conscripts. Some were judges, prosecutors, police, and other civil servants. Detainees were primarily men and were as young as 20.

The accounts of lawyers, who spoke on condition of anonymity, were strikingly similar.

All the lawyers said that in the majority of the cases detainees were held pre-charge for four or more days by the police. With very few exceptions, their clients were being held incommunicado throughout this period and had not been able to inform their families of where they were or what was happening to them.

They were also not able to phone a lawyer and in most cases did not see their lawyers until shortly before being brought to court or being interrogated by prosecutors. One lawyer told Amnesty International that when she finally saw her clients, “[They] gave me the contact information [for their families] so I could call them. The families knew nothing. They were happy to hear their sons were alive.”

Amnesty International spoke with a relative of a high-ranking military official who was detained in Ankara. He said that family members were able to speak with the detained relative on his mobile phone on Saturday 16 July before it was confiscated by the police, but that the family has had no information about his fate or whereabouts since then. Family members made several trips to detention centres in Ankara but were consistently told the detainee was not there. The detainee has also had no access to a lawyer. Such treatment amounts to enforced disappearance which in itself is a crime under international law. This practice places detainees outside the protection of the law and cuts them off from the outside world, putting them at very high risk of torture or even extrajudicial execution.

The lawyers told Amnesty International that in most cases neither they nor their clients were informed of the specific charges against them, either in a charge sheet or in court, making it difficult to prepare a defence. Soldiers who had been detained were brought to court in groups as large as 20 and 25 people. One lawyer described trying to defend his client in the current environment as “trying to find something with the lights off”.

Only one of the detainees represented by lawyers who spoke to Amnesty International was able to choose her own lawyer. According to the other interviewees, private lawyers were not allowed to represent detainees, who were all assigned bar association legal aid lawyers. The detainees’ access to their lawyers was also limited. Lawyers told Amnesty International that after the hearings they were not allowed to speak to their clients who were remanded in pre-trial detention.

Turkey is understandably concerned with public security at the moment, but no circumstances can ever justify torture and other ill-treatment or arbitrary detention
John Dalhuisen

“These are grave violations of the right to a fair trial which is enshrined in both Turkey’s national law and international law,” said John Dalhuisen.

“Turkey is understandably concerned with public security at the moment, but no circumstances can ever justify torture and other ill-treatment or arbitrary detention. The climate in Turkey right now is one of fear and shock. The government must steer the country on the path to respect for rights and law, not engage in retribution.”

Information provided to Amnesty International by lawyers reflected that many detainees were being held arbitrarily. In the vast majority of cases, they said that no evidence establishing reasonable suspicion of criminal behaviour was presented against their clients during the charge hearings; and the hearing did not establish that there were permissible reasons for detention pending trial.

Instead, lawyers explained that judges ordered detained soldiers to be placed in pre-trial detention if they left their barracks the evening of the coup, regardless of the reason. In one case, a detainee who appeared before the court was not asked a single question by the judge at her hearing.

Some of the questioning by judges was entirely irrelevant to the events of the coup attempt, and appeared intended to establish any link to Fethullah Gülen or institutions sympathetic to him.

Authorities accuse Gülen of masterminding the coup attempt, which he has denied.

Lawyers explained that detainees were remanded in pre-trial detention even without a finding that a detainee was a flight risk or that there was a risk a detainee would tamper with evidence, as is legally required.

Detaining people in connection with a criminal charge without demonstrating that you have evidence of criminal wrongdoing is by definition arbitrary and unlawful
John Dalhuisen

“Detaining people in connection with a criminal charge without demonstrating that you have evidence of criminal wrongdoing is by definition arbitrary and unlawful,” said John Dalhuisen.

“These highly irregular, and seemingly systematic practices, must be investigated.”

Recommendations

Amnesty International urges the European Committee for the Prevention of Torture (CPT) to conduct an emergency visit to Turkey to monitor conditions of detention. As a member of the Council of Europe, the Turkish government has an obligation to cooperate with the CPT. The CPT is the only independent body authorized to conduct ad hoc visits to all places of detention in Turkey at the time of their choosing.

The National Human Rights Institution of Turkey, which had access to detention facilities in the country to monitor conditions of detention, was abolished in April 2016 leaving no institution in the country with this mandate. In the current environment, in which thousands of detainees are being held incommunicado, without access to lawyers or relatives, for lengthy pre-charge periods, in irregular detention centres and amid allegations of torture and other ill-treatment, it is vital that monitors are allowed access.

Amnesty International urges the Turkish authorities to adhere to their obligations under international human rights law and not to abuse the state of emergency by trampling on the rights of detainees
John Dalhuisen

“Amnesty International urges the Turkish authorities to adhere to their obligations under international human rights law and not to abuse the state of emergency by trampling on the rights of detainees,” said John Dalhuisen.

“The prohibition of torture is absolute and can never be compromised or suspended.”

Amnesty International urges the Turkish authorities to condemn torture and other ill-treatment in places of detention, and take concrete steps to combat it and hold perpetrators accountable.

Authorities should ensure bar associations and family members are notified of detentions without delay and that lawyers have unimpeded access to their clients at all stages of detention.

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