Tag Archives: YouTube

Behind The Scenes At Navalny TV

Russia’s leading opposition politician, Aleksei Navalny, can’t get airtime on state TV or Russia’s private (but pro-Kremlin) TV stations — so he set up his own on Youtube. Navalny LIVE broadcasts from a Moscow business center, and its videos can reach millions.

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Police break up ‘fully-fledged’ Tube train rave with MC and sound system on Bakerloo line

Police were called to break-up a “fully-fledged rave” on board a packed Tube train, featuring flashing lights, a sound system and an MC.

A video uploaded to YouTube showed laughing revellers dancing to booming drum ‘n’ bass in the Bakerloo line carriage.

Award-winning MC Harry Shotta told the passengers: “Real live drum ‘n’ bass on the Underground right now.”

Continue reading Police break up ‘fully-fledged’ Tube train rave with MC and sound system on Bakerloo line

The revolution will not be shared

BY SOLE

I think about alienation all the time. I think about it as I sit on the toilet and stare at my iPhone and ready essays about Greek anarchists. I think about it when I am at a concert and half the crowd is watching the show through a smartphone camera. I think about it as I click through the daily report of direct actions, memes, hip new music tracks, and global insurrections.

I could watch a YouTube clip of a city devastated in a nuclear blast and I don’t think it would affect me at all.

Continue reading The revolution will not be shared

Americans Listening to Playlists Over Albums, Study Finds

Playlists accounted for 31% of the total listening time across all demographics

More people in the U.S. listen to playlists than albums, according to a new study.

The results of the survey by consumer insight group LOOP (Lots of Online People), published by the Music Business Association, showed that playlists accounted for 31% of the total listening time across all demographics, whereas albums only constituted 22%.

Continue reading Americans Listening to Playlists Over Albums, Study Finds

If The Characters Of “Friends” Had The Internet

Rachel

Rachel would be your worst nightmare as a friend on Facebook, regularly changing her relationship status to “it’s complicated” — it’s not; her and Ross have just had a small argument — and humblebragging constantly.

Joey

Tinder / Warner Bros. / BuzzFeed

Tinder / Warner Bros. / BuzzFeed
Joey would be a full-time Tinder player, although his charm wouldn’t come across through online messaging. He’d eventually delete the app after regularly stumbling across people he’s dated in the real world.

Monica

Monica
Pinterest / BuzzFeed
The quintessential Pinterest user, Monica would spend her evenings obsessively organising her many created pinboards and occasionally criticising the boards of others.

Ross

Ross
LinkedIn / Warner Bros. / BuzzFeed
Ross would hate all social media but still have a LinkedIn profile because apparently “that doesn’t count”.

Phoebe

Phoebe
Youtube / Warner Bros. / BuzzFeed
An uploaded video of “Smelly Cat” on YouTube would go viral, although not as much as the Auto-Tuned version, which would make Phoebe internet famous. She’d continue posting videos and gain a small but devoted fandom on the site.

Chandler

Chandler
Twitter / Warner Bros. / BuzzFeed
Chandler would almost definitely have a Twitter account, where he’d be tweeting terrible, but very occasionally OK-ish puns to a decent follower count.

Gunther

Gunther
Google+ / Warner Bros. / BuzzFeed
Gunther made one post on Google+ in 2011. He still regularly checks to see if anyone’s responded to it yet.

BBCtrending: Pakistan’s ‘drunk mullah’

A television news discussion

A leading Islamic scholar in Pakistan who appeared to slur his words on live TV has become the subject of ridicule on social media.

When it comes to Islamic clerics in Pakistan, few are more senior than Hafiz Tahir Ashrafi. His opinion on Islamic scripture is sought by the nation’s lawmakers.

But this is a country where it is illegal for Muslims to drink alcohol, so it’s unsurprising that his apparently intoxicated appearance on a late night talk show has caused controversy.

He made a seemingly slurred speech criticizing the moral conduct of Pakistani cricketer-turned-politician Imran Khan. As he spoke, one of the TV hosts visibly tried to hide his amusement.

The accusation that he was “drunk” came the next day, on social media. In Pakistan, where YouTube is officially banned, footage of the TV show soon appeared on Dailymotion, another video sharing website.

One clip alone has been viewed more than 290,000 times, and been shared more than 3,500 times on Facebook. There was outrage on social media.

 

“Drunk mullah on live TV and he gets away with it. The society is a joke,” said one tweet. Oscar-winning documentary filmmaker Sharmeen Obaidwrote: “What an interesting clip feat Maulana Ashrafi worth watching 2 understand #maulvis in #pakistan double standards.”

But there are signs the social media criticism of Ashrafi may have been orchestrated. Several Twitter users commenting on the video identified themselves as supporters of Imran Khan’s political party, the PTI, and others said they were members of the PAT, led by Sufi cleric Tahir ul-Qadri’s.

BBC Trending spoke to Dr Awab Alvi who is part of the PTI party’s social media team.

 

He admitted the party had made a deliberate social media effort to criticise Ashrafi. “The cleric used his mixed political and Islamic agenda to defame Imran Khan’s character,” he says, “he picked a raw nerve and we rubbed it in.”

But was Ashrafi really drunk? In an interview with BBC Trending, he denied having consumed alcohol and instead said he had been chewing paan, a traditional mixture of tobacco leaves.

He says he is being deliberately targeted because the PUC, a body of religious scholars that he chairs, opposes recent street protests by Khan and Qadri’s parties.

“I see political and religious propaganda behind the social media uproar,” he says. The incident continues to trend on social media, with internet memes showing paan-flavoured alcohol and film posters mocking his appearance.