Tag Archives: Tibet

Dalai Lama meets Indian guard from 1959 flight from Tibet

The Dalai Lama has come face to face with an Indian soldier who guarded him almost 60 years ago as he fled from Tibet to exile in India.

The Tibetan spiritual leader, 81, met Naren Chandra Das, 79, as he paid a visit to northeast India.

“Looking at your face, I now realise I must be very old too,” he said.

He first met the guard in 1959 after a gruelling two-week trek across the mountains from Lhasa, after a failed Tibetan uprising against Chinese rule.

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Story of the Potala: World’s Highest Palace in Tibet

February 13, 2013 marked 100 years since His Holiness 13th Dalai Lama proclaimed the restoration of Tibet’s independence following a period of Qing domination. In the last few years, February 13th has been celebrated as Tibetan Independence Day in over 30 cities worldwide.

Each year, on this date, Tibetans and their supporters have celebrated various symbols of Tibetan independence: the Tibetan national flag, the 1913 Tibetan Proclamation of Independence, the historical pillar in Lhasa erected to mark a peace treaty between Tibet and China.

This year’s global celebration of this important day is being marked by highlighting the historical importance of the great Potala Palace of Tibet and Tibetan people’s vision for a free and democratic Tibet. Today, China attempts to portray the Potala Palace solely as a tourist attraction.

However, for the Tibetan people, the Potala Palace is much more than an attractive monument; it is a representation of Tibet’s independent past and a symbol of Tibet’s future statehood for Tibetans around the globe.

Képtalálat a következőre: „The Potala Palace in Lhasa”

Below are ten interesting facts about this world heritage site known as the Potala Palace:

1. The Potala Palace in Lhasa, the capital city of Tibet, was the chief residence of His Holiness the Dalai Lama. It also served as the seat of the Tibetan Government for hundreds of years, until China’s illegal invasion of Tibet in 1949. So in terms of symbolism, it is like the White House and the Capitol Building combined in one majestic edifice.

Continue reading Story of the Potala: World’s Highest Palace in Tibet

Tibet Facing Double Environmental Disasters As Climate Change Is Melting Glaciers And Tibet Population Growth Spurs Pollution

Tibet is facing a double-whammy of disasters. China’s western so-called autonomous region is getting warmer and wetter, just as rampant population growth is creating pollution problems.

Continue reading Tibet Facing Double Environmental Disasters As Climate Change Is Melting Glaciers And Tibet Population Growth Spurs Pollution

China: Along the Tea Horse Road (PHOTOS)

In Yunnan province, visitors can still step back into the Ming dynasty.

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On the dashboard of our van, a solar-powered Tibetan prayer wheel spins continuously as we make our way through the bumpy roads linking Lijiang, Dali and Tengchong.

Continue reading China: Along the Tea Horse Road (PHOTOS)

Almanac: The Dalai Lama

And now a page from our “Sunday Morning” Almanac: October 5th, 1989, 25 years ago today . . . the day the Norwegian Nobel Committee announced it was awarding that year’s Peace Prize to the 14th Dalai Lama, the political and spiritual leader of the people of Tibet.

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The Dalai Lama (born Tenzin Gyatso in 1935), the traditional religious and temporal head of Tibet’s Buddhist clergy, in 1959.

He was born in 1935. Buddhist leaders declared him — while still a young boy — to be the re-incarnation of the 13th Dalai Lama.

Monks prepared him for his new role, a role that was disrupted in 1959, when Chinese occupying troops forced him, at the age of 23, to flee Tibet for exile in India.

In the years that followed, the Dalai Lama has steadfastly championed the Tibetan cause, while at the same time opposing any resort to violence.

Instead, as the Nobel committee emphasized, the Dalai Lama “advocated peaceful solutions based upon tolerance and mutual respect in order to preserve the historical and cultural heritage of his people.”

The Dalai Lama accepted the Peace Prize at a ceremony in Oslo on December 10, 1989.

In his Nobel lecture speech he included a prayer:

For as long as space endures,
And for as long as living beings remain,
Until then may I, too, abide
To dispel the misery of the world.

And in the quarter-century since, he has continued to speak out for Tibet . . . and for non-violence and tolerance, earning the admiration of people of all faiths all around the world.

A ceremony in India this past week marked the 25th anniversary of his Peace Prize . . . but what the future holds is in some doubt.

The Dalai Lama forswore the political part of his role in 2011, and at age 79 he has questioned whether there should even be a 15th Dalai Lama after he’s gone.

Top Tibetan Monk On Money Laundering Charge

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A Tibetan monk seen as a possible successor to the Dalai Lama is to be prosecuted for money laundering.

The decision to prosecute Karmapa Urgyen Trinley comes after an Indian court overturned a decision to drop charges.

A judge at the Himachal Pradesh High Court issued an order for authorities to open criminal proceedings over the recovery of around $1m (£650,000) in foreign currency during a raid on his Buddhist monastery four years ago.

Criminal conspiracy charges were filed after the raid but a district court in 2012 dismissed the case but the latest appeal means Trinley now faces judicial proceedings.

The case dates back to a raid in January 2011 on a monastery in the Himalayan town of Dharamshala in which investigators say stacks of bank notes in 26 different currencies were recovered, including the equivalent of £65,000 in Chinese yuan.

The raid came after police stopped two people driving a car that was full of cash – the pair said the money was intended for a land deal involving a trust run by Trinley.

Khenchen Lama Rinpoche will give three separate public teachings at The Friends Meeting House, Kettering, on Monday, July 13

The 30-year-old has denied any wrongdoing, saying the bank notes were donations from devotees gathered over the years and he was not involved in any land deals.

The monk, who fled Tibet at the age of 14, is recognised by both China and the Dalai Lama as the reincarnation of the Karmapa Lama, the 17th incarnation of the head of the Karma Kagyu lineage, one of the four major schools of Tibetan Buddhism.

Since fleeing Tibet and reaching India after an eight-day journey on foot and horseback, Trinley has lived mainly at the Gyuto Monastery in Dharamshala, the northern Indian hill station that is the seat of the Tibetan government in exile.

He is seen as having the highest profile of an array of young lamas who could succeed the 80-year-old Dalai Lama.

Their appearances together have increased speculation he is being groomed as the Nobel peace laureate’s spiritual successor.

Trinley’s spokesman, Kunzang Chungyalpa, said the lama had great faith in India’s judicial system.

“He strongly believes truth will prevail at the end.”