Tag Archives: RIP

Watch the last song and gig that Tom Petty ever played

Following the death of Tom Petty, his show at the Hollywood Bowl last month has now become his last ever gig. Check out footage and the setlist below.

News of Petty’s death was confirmed this morning by longtime Heartbreakers manager Tony Dimitriades on behalf of his family. He died at UCLA Santa Monica Hospital following a cardiac arrest. He was 66-years-old.

Continue reading Watch the last song and gig that Tom Petty ever played

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Prince Reportedly Treated for Drug Overdose Before Death; 911 Details Released

Prince was reportedly treated for a drug overdose six days before his death on Thursday, according to TMZ.

Prince’s jet plane made an emergency landing in Moline, Ill., last Friday due to a medical emergency. His rep told Variety at the time that the singer was struggling with the flu.

According to the TMZ report, doctors gave Prince a “safe shot” after he was rushed to the hospital, something reportedly given to counteract the effects of opiates. Doctors apparently advised that Prince stay in the hospital for 24 hours — he left, however, after three hours.

Authorities found Prince unresponsive in an elevator when they arrived Thursday morning, responding to a 911 call. First responders tried CPR, but were unable to revive the pop star and he was pronounced dead at 10:07 a.m.

Police are continuing to investigate the circumstances surrounding Prince’s death. His autopsy will be performed on Friday.

The Carver County Sheriff’s Office also released the transcript of the 911 call that an unidentified male made to report Prince’s death. The caller said the people at the house were “distraught,” and said he didn’t know how Prince died.

NEC Birmingham

See the full transcript, which began at 9:43 a.m. on Thursday, below.

Dispatcher: 911, where is your emergency?

Unidentified male: Hi there, um, what’s the address here? Yeah we need an ambulance right now.

D: Okay.

UM: We have someone who is unconscious.

D: Okay, what’s the address?

UM: Um, we’re at Prince’s house.

D: Okay, does anybody know the address? Is there any mail around that you could look at?

UM: Yeah, yeah, okay, hold on.

D: Okay, your cell phone’s not going to tell me where you’re at, so I need you to find me an address.

UM: Yeah, we have um, yeah, we have um, so yeah, um, the person is dead here.

D: Okay, get me the address please.

UM: Okay, okay, I’m working on it.

D: Concentrate on that.

UM: And the people are just distraught.

D: I understand that they are distraught, but…

UM: I’m working on it, I’m working on it.

D: Okay, do we know how the person died?

UM: I don’t know, I don’t know.

D: Okay.

UM: Um, so we’re, we’re in Minneapolis, Minnesota and we are at the home of Prince.

D: You’re in Minneapolis?

UM: Yeah, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

D: You’re sure you are in Minneapolis?

UM: That’s correct.

D: Okay, have you found an address yet?

UM: Yeah, um, I’m so sorry I need, I need the address here?

Unidentified female: 7801

UM: 7801

D: 7801 what?

UM: Paisley Park, we are at Paisley Park.

D: You’re at Paisley Park, okay, that’s in Chanhassen. Are you with the person who’s…

UM: Yes, it’s Prince.

D: Okay.

UM: The person.

D: Okay, stay on the line with me.

UM: Okay.

(Phone ringing)

National Exhibition Centre

Ambulance dispatcher: Ambulance, Shirley.

D: Carver with the transfer for Paisley Park Studios, 78.

AD: Paisley Park Studios, okay.

D: 7801 Audubon Road.

AD: Okay.

D: We have a person down, not breathing.

AD: Down, not breathing.

D: Yup.

UM: He’s, he’s…

D: We’re going to get everybody, go ahead with the transmittal.

Prince has passed away at the age of 57

MINNESOTA — The artist known as Prince has died, according to TMZ. He was 57.

Prince’s body was discovered at his Paisley Park compound in Minnesota early Thursday morning, April 21st.

The singer — full name Prince Rogers Nelson — had a medical emergency on April 15th that forced his private jet to make an emergency landing in Illinois. But he appeared at a concert the next day to assure his fans he was okay. His people told TMZ he was battling the flu.

Prior to his most recent appearance however, Prince had cancelled two shows due to health concerns.

Prince became an international superstar in 1982 after his breakthrough album “1999.”

He went on to churn out a ton of hits — racking up seven Grammys in the process. He also performed at the Super Bowl in 2007 in one of the greatest live performances of all time.

He also sold more than 100 million records during his career and the Academy Award for Best Original Song Score for Purple Rain in 1985.

Prince was married two times — the first time to his backup dancer Mayte Garcia. They split in 2000. He then married Manuela Testolini but they split in 2006.

Robin Williams, Cherished Comedian and Oscar-Winning Actor, Dead at 63

(Photo by Ben Gabbe/Getty Images)

Robin Williams, the Oscar-winning actor and comedian died this morning in his home at the age of 63, according to a police statement.

At 11:55 a.m., police were called to Williams’ home where he was pronounced dead at 12:02 p.m. According to the Marin County Sheriff’s Office Coroner Division “suspects the death to be a suicide due to asphyxia.” A comprehensive investigation has yet to be made.

Williams’ publicist has confirmed the news. Mara Roberts, a press representative for Williams, released a statement this afternoon saying that “Robin Williams passed away this morning. He has been battling with depression of late.”

robin-instagram-

His wife, Susan Schneider, also released a statement saying: “This morning I lost my husband and my best friend, while the world lost one of its most beloved artists and beautiful human beings,” she said in the statement. “On behalf of Robin’s family, we are asking for privacy during our time of profound grief. As he is remembered, it is our hope that the focus will not be on Robin’s death, but on the countless moments of joy and laughter he gave to millions.”

Johnny Winter, blues guitarist, dies aged 70

Johnny Winter performing at the San Javier Jazz International Festival in Murcia, Spain, in 2008

Blues musician and producer Johnny Winter has died at the age of 70.

Winter, who played with Jimi Hendrix and Muddy Waters, was a friend of John Lennon, who wrote Rock and Roll People in his honour. Mick Jagger and Keith Richards wrote a song for him in 1973 called Silver Train.

Born John Dawson Winter III on February 23, 1944 in Mississippi, and raised in Beaumont, Texas, Winter began playing the clarinet aged five, and switched to the ukelele and then the guitar a few years later. He was the subject in May 2014 of a documentary film called Johnny Winter: Down & Dirty, which was made by Greg Olliver and had its premiere at the SXSW Festival.

His big break came while opening a show for Mike Bloomfield in 1968. Winter’s display caught the eye of Columbia Records, who signed him to a contract with a £400,000 advance.

Winter, like his brother and musician Edgar (of Edgar Winter Group fame) was an albino and known for his long, blond hair and a cowboy hat. During the late Sixties, he performed frequently with Janis Joplin and the pair became lovers.

As well as being a fine musician, he also helped revive the careers of friends and blues musicians John Lee Hooker and Muddy Waters through Grammy-winning collaborations. Winter produced three Waters albums – Hard Again (1977), I’m Ready (1978) and King Bee (1981) as well as 1979′s Muddy “Mississippi” Waters – Live. Asked once what Waters was like as a bandleader? he replied: “Muddy was very strict. If he didn’t like something, he would tell the guys.”

Winter suffered from terrible addiction problems with heroin in the early Seventies and although he had spells of recovery, much of the Nineties was blighted by a reliance on antidepressants, vodka and methadone.

In 2011, he made an album called Roots – covering classics such as Chuck Berry’s Maybelline and Robert Johnson’s Dust My Broom and featuring guest musicians such as Warren Haynes and country star Vince Gill – which was a critical success. In all he made more than 20 albums and received seven Grammy nominations. He was named as the 63rd best guitarist ever by Rolling Stone magazine.

Even at 70, Winter was still performing around 200 concerts a year and admitted once that “guitar is the only thing I was ever really great at”. Winter, who died in Zurich, Switzerland, was due to release a new album entitled Step Back on September 2.

RIP Bobby Womack

bobby-womack

Singer and songwriter Bobby Dwayne Womack has died, aged 70. The cause of death is as yet unknown but Womack had been suffering from Alzheimer’s and also fought long, hard battles with cocaine addiction.

His career in music spanned nearly six decades and Womack worked with a range of stars from The Rolling Stones and Janis Joplin to Damon Albarn. Albarn collaborated with Womack on The Bravest Man In The Universe, released on XL in 2012 to critical acclaim. Earlier this year Albarn said of Womack, “when that voice comes out, it is something that is somehow touched by God.”

His final record, the now poignantly titled The Best Is Yet To Come is set for release later this year.

Sadly, Womack was blighted by addictions and personal problems throughout his life, but always held onto that incredible voice. Widely regarded as one of the greatest R&B singers of all time, he will be sorely missed by a legion of artists and fans.

Eli Wallach, Multifaceted Actor, Dies at 98

Eli Wallach at 2011 Oscars ceremony in Hollywood, 27 February 2011

Eli Wallach, who was one of his generation’s most prominent and prolific character actors in film, onstage and on television for more than 60 years, died on Tuesday. He was 98.

His death was confirmed by his daughter Katherine.

A self-styled journeyman actor, the versatile Mr. Wallach appeared in scores of roles, often with his wife, Anne Jackson. No matter the part, he always seemed at ease and in control, whether playing a Mexican bandit in the 1960 western “The Magnificent Seven,” a bumbling clerk in Ionesco’s allegorical play “Rhinoceros,” a henpecked French general in Jean Anouilh’s “Waltz of the Toreadors,” Clark Gable’s sidekick in “The Misfits” or a Mafia don in “The Godfather: Part III.”

Eli Wallach with Carroll Baker in Baby Doll

Despite his many years of film work, some of it critically acclaimed, Mr. Wallach was never nominated for an Academy Award. But in November 2010, less than a month before his 95th birthday, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences awarded him an honorary Oscar, saluting him as “the quintessential chameleon, effortlessly inhabiting a wide range of characters, while putting his inimitable stamp on every role.”

His first love was the stage. Mr. Wallach and Ms. Jackson became one of the best-known acting couples in the American theater. But films, even less than stellar ones, helped pay the bills. “For actors, movies are a means to an end,” Mr. Wallach said in an interview with The New York Times in 1973. “I go and get on a horse in Spain for 10 weeks, and I have enough cushion to come back and do a play.”

Mr. Wallach, who as a boy was one of the few Jewish children in his mostly Italian-American neighborhood in Brooklyn, made both his stage and screen breakthroughs playing Italians. In 1951, six years after his Broadway debut in a play called “Skydrift,” he was cast opposite Maureen Stapleton in Tennessee Williams’s “The Rose Tattoo,” playing Alvaro Mangiacavallo, a truck driver who woos and wins Serafina Delle Rose, a Sicilian widow living on the Gulf Coast. Both Ms. Stapleton and Mr. Wallach won Tony Awards for their work in the play.

The first movie in which Mr. Wallach acted was also written by Williams: “Baby Doll” (1956), the playwright’s screen adaptation of his “27 Wagons Full of Cotton.” Mr. Wallach played Silva Vacarro, a Sicilian émigré and the owner of a cotton gin that he believes has been torched. Karl Malden and Carroll Baker also starred.

Mr. Wallach, a few weeks before he was given an honorary Oscar. Credit Ed Ou for The New York Times

Mr. Wallach never stayed away from the theater for long. After “The Rose Tattoo” he appeared in another Williams play, “Camino Real” (1953), wandering a fantasy world as a young man named Kilroy. He also played opposite Julie Harris in Anouilh’s “Mademoiselle Colombe” (1954), about a young woman who chooses a life in the theater over life with her dour husband, and in 1958 he appeared with Joan Plowright in “The Chairs,” Eugène Ionesco’s farcical portrait of an elderly couple’s garrulous farewell to life.

In another Ionesco allegory, a 1961 production of “Rhinoceros,” Mr. Wallach gave a low-key performance as a nondescript clerk in a city where people are being transformed into rhinoceroses. The cast also included Ms. Jackson and Zero Mostel.

By the time “Rhinoceros” came along, Ms. Jackson and Mr. Wallach had been married for 13 years. They met in 1946 in an Equity Library Theater production of Williams’s “This Property Is Condemned” and were married two years later. A list of survivors was incomplete.

Eli Wallach (centre) in The Magnificent Seven

Eli Wallach was born on Dec. 7, 1915, the son of Abraham Wallach and the former Bertha Schorr. He graduated from Erasmus Hall High School in Brooklyn and attended the University of Texas at Austin (“because the tuition was $30 a year,” he once said), where he also learned to ride horses — a skill he would put to good use in westerns. After graduation he returned to New York and earned a master’s degree in education at City College, with the intention of becoming a teacher like his brother and two sisters.

Instead, he studied acting at the Neighborhood Playhouse until World War II put him in the Army. He served five years in the Medical Corps, rising to captain. After the war he became a founding member of the Actors Studio and studied method acting with Lee Strasberg. Ahead lay his Broadway debut in “Skydrift,” which had a one-week run in 1945, and his fateful meeting with an actress named Anne Jackson.

The Wallachs went on to become stalwarts of the American stage, evoking memories of Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne, thanks to their work in comedies like “The Typists” and “The Tiger,” a 1963 double bill by Murray Schisgal, and a revival of Anouilh’s “Waltz of the Toreadors” (1973).

Eli Wallach with Clint Eastwood in The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

In a joint interview in The Hartford Courant in 2000, Mr. Wallach and Ms. Jackson said they had sought out opportunities to work together. “But we’re not the couple we play onstage,” Ms. Jackson said. “For us, it’s fun to separate the two.”

The couple appeared in a revival of “The Diary of Anne Frank” in 1978, in a production that also featured their daughters Roberta as Anne Frank and Katherine as her onstage sister. In 1984, they presided over a chaotic Moscow household in a Russian comedy, Viktor Rozov’s “Nest of the Wood Grouse,” directed by Joseph Papp at the Public Theater. Four years later, they returned to the Public as a flamboyant acting couple in a revival of Hy Kraft’s “Cafe Crown,” a portrait of the Yiddish theater scene in its heyday.

In 1993, they presented a theatrical reminiscence, “In Persons.” The next year, they played a biblical husband and wife in a revival of Clifford Odets’s “Flowering Peach” by the National Actors Theater, and in 2000 they were a pair of retired comedians in Anne Meara’s Off Broadway play “Down the Garden Paths.”

Eli Wallach and Anne Jackson

In between appearances with Ms. Jackson, Mr. Wallach played, among other roles, an aging gay barber in Charles Dyer’s “Staircase” (1968), a political dissident consigned to an asylum in Tom Stoppard’s “Every Good Boy Deserves Favour” (1979), an aged but mentally spry furniture dealer in a 1992 revival of Arthur Miller’s play “The Price” and a Jewish widower in Jeff Baron’s “Visiting Mr. Green” (1997).

Mr. Wallach’s many television credits included a 1974 production of Odets’s “Paradise Lost” on public television; “Skokie,” a 1981 CBS movie about a march planned by neo-Nazis in a Chicago suburb, in which he played a lawyer representing Holocaust survivors; a 1982 NBC dramatization of Norman Mailer’s “Executioner’s Song,” in which he appeared with Tommy Lee Jones; and frequent roles on “Studio One,” “Playhouse 90,” “General Electric Theater.”

And then there were films, dozens of them. In addition to his parts in “Baby Doll” and “The Magnificent Seven,” he played the mechanic pal of Clark Gable’s aging cowboy in “The Misfits” (1961), the story of a wild-horse roundup in Nevada, written by Miller and directed by John Huston, with a cast that also included Marilyn Monroe and Montgomery Clift.

Mr. Wallach was also a lawless jungle tyrant subdued by the title character (Peter O’Toole) in “Lord Jim” (1965); a rapacious Mexican pitted against Clint Eastwood and Lee Van Cleef in Sergio Leone’s so-called spaghetti western “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly” (1966); a psychiatrist assigned to evaluate the sanity of a call girl (Barbra Streisand) on trial for killing a client in “Nuts” (1987); and Don Altobello, a Mafia boss who succumbs to a poisoned dessert, in “The Godfather: Part III” (1990).

Eli Wallach with (l to r) Anne Bancroft, Ben Stiller and Jenna Elfman in Keeping the Faith

He continued his film work well into his 90s. He was a disillusioned screenwriter in “The Holiday” (2006). In “Tickling Leo” (2009), he played the guilt-ridden patriarch of a Jewish family still haunted by the Holocaust. In Roman Polanski’s “Ghost Writer” (2010), Mr. Wallach played a mysterious old man living on fog-shrouded Martha’s Vineyard. And in “Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps” (2010), which marked the return of Michael Douglas as the greed-stoked investor Gordon Gekko, Mr. Wallach hovered at the edge of the action like Poe’s sinister raven.

More often than not, his film roles required him to play mustachioed characters who were lawless, evil or just plain nasty, which puzzled and challenged him. “Actually I lead a dual life,” he once said. “In the theater, I’m the little man, or the irritated man, the misunderstood man,” whereas in films “I do seem to keep getting cast as the bad guys.” His villain roles, he said, tended to be “more complex” than some of his stage roles.

Even so, the theater remained his home base, and he said that he could never imagine leaving it. “What else am I going to do?” he asked in an interview with The Times in 1997. “I love to act.”

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