Tag Archives: peru

Your Next Slope Sweater Should Come from Peruvian Alpaca Llamas

Every once in a while Kickstarter comes through with a product that literally anyone can get behind. Paka , the alpaca wool sweater knitted in Peru, is one of those products.

While taking a year to work and travel through South America, Paka founder Kris Cody came across a beautiful alpaca wool sweater, hand-woven by a grandmother high in the Peruvian Andes, that he bought and brought back with him to the U.S. Every time he would wear the sweater out, Cody says, “People would come up to me and ask where it was from — where they could get one.

Continue reading Your Next Slope Sweater Should Come from Peruvian Alpaca Llamas

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Take the High Route: The Best High Elevation Hikes Around the World

Taking the high route involves more preparation, both physically and mentally. Our list below of some of the world’s best high elevation hikes will take you to new heights while also possibly allowing you to discover something you didn’t know about yourself.

Inca Trail, Peru

Machu Picchu

While there are other trails that can get you to the famous archaeological ruins of Machu Picchu, none or more famous than the Inca Trail. While you can get to the mythical citadel without making the trek, you will miss out on imposing mountain passes, snow capped peaks visible along the route, cloud forest high in the Andes and the opportunity to walk in the footsteps of the Inca. The 3-4 day trek can only be done with an approved outfitter and there are limits on the number of people allowed on the trail daily. Plan early as slots fill up fast.

Kilimanjaro, Tanzania

Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania

Climbing to the rooftop of Africa can be a daunting task. While multiple routes exist to summit the continent’s highest peak (19,340 feet), the Machame and Marangu routes are the most popular. The trek can can between 7-8 days depending on the route and will take you through a multitude of ecosystems from tropical jungle to glacial snowfields on your way to the summit. If you desire to see the the snow atop the peak, you better hurry as they are expected to be completely gone within the next decade.

Everest Base Camp Trek, Nepal

Mount Everest Nepal

Whether you have a desire to climb the world’s highest peak, making the trek to Everest Base Camp can afford you to walk among giants with views of Mount Everest being the highlight. The route will take you from Lukla, Nepal through beautiful forests, numerous villages and will take you over 19,000 feet before descending back down to EBC. The trek takes about two weeks so allow yourself ample time on the front end of your trip to stay and tour Kathmandu.

Snowman Trek, Bhutan

Taktsang Palphug Monastery, The Tigers Nest, Bhutan

Taktsang Palphug Monastery, The Tigers Nest, Bhutan

Crossing more than 10 passes above 14,000 feet (and some at 18,000 feet), this trek will take more than three weeks and is considered to be one of the most difficult in the world. Located along the Tibet-Bhutan border, this journey will take the most experienced of hikers to Buddhist monasteries perched on the side of cliffs along with experiencing some of the most dramatic landscapes you will ever witness.

Tour du Mont Blanc – France, Switzerland, and Italy

Mont Blanc to Switzerland

As the name implies, this ambitious trek encircles the Mont Blanc massif taking trekkers from France to Italy to Switzerland and back to France. Some 20,000 hikers attempt this adventure each year. While the trek can seem imposing, the trail is well marked, has multiple lodging options, and doesn’t require any real technical skills.

Four of the World’s Most Dangerous Trails for the Adrenaline Junkie

Hiking by most accounts involves nothing more than putting one foot in front of the other over and over until you reach your final destination. However, some of the most dangerous adventures in the world involve simply navigating a trail with nothing more than a healthy dose of fear and a desire to push your self to the edge–just not over it.

Continue reading Four of the World’s Most Dangerous Trails for the Adrenaline Junkie

Drug War Debate Divides Latin America, U.S. at OAS Summit

Latin American governments traditionally allied with the U.S. on anti-drug efforts are increasingly divided as countries from Costa Rica to Colombia seek a debate over legalization at a regional summit.

Officials from the 35 members of the Organization of American States are meeting in Guatemala City today in a special session called a year ago to address counter-narcotics policies.

Continue reading Drug War Debate Divides Latin America, U.S. at OAS Summit

A photographer has spent 3 years taking pictures of women to see how beauty is defined around the world

In 2013, 30-year-old photographer Mihaela Noroc quit her job in Romania to backpack around the world full time.

Since then, she has visited every continent except for Antarctica and a total of about 50 countries, photographing hundreds of women along the way for her project, dubbed Atlas of Beauty.

And she’s still going.

More than ever, I think our world needs an Atlas of Beauty to show that diversity is something beautiful, not a reason for conflict,” Noroc explains to Tech Insider. “I hope that the portraits from The Atlas of Beauty can challenge many misconceptions that exist around the world.”

Noroc’s proficiency in five languages helps her speak with subjects either on the street or in their homes, but sometimes she relies on translators or body language alone to communicate.

Currently, she’s looking for funding to continue her journey, and hopes by 2017 to have enough images to publish a book.

You can follow Noroc’s trip and view more work on her Facebook, Instagram and Tumblraccounts. Keep scrolling to see more of her amazing images.

This is Mihaela Noroc posing in Bogotá, Colombia. The 30-year-old photographer travels the world taking photographs of women from different cultures.

Noroc has spent three years traveling for her “Atlas of Beauty” series. This woman was photographed on the streets of Moldova.

Noroc has spent three years traveling for her "Atlas of Beauty" series. This woman was photographed on the streets of Moldova.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

“I walk hours every day, in very different environments and I try to find relevant faces and stories for each place,” Noroc tells Tech Insider. This woman was in Peru.

"I walk hours every day, in very different environments and I try to find relevant faces and stories for each place," Noroc tells Tech Insider. This woman was in Peru.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

She also finds subjects online. Sometimes she’s invited back to their homes. Here, an Ecuadorian woman in her living room.

She also finds subjects online. Sometimes she's invited back to their homes. Here, an Ecuadorian woman in her living room.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

This woman is a market seller from Dushanbe, Tajikistan.

This woman is a market seller from Dushanbe, Tajikistan.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

Noroc photographed women in the Wakhan Corridor in Afghanistan. “Although they live in a rough and isolated environment, Wakhi people are amazingly welcoming and friendly,” Noroc says.

Noroc photographed women in the Wakhan Corridor in Afghanistan. "Although they live in a rough and isolated environment, Wakhi people are amazingly welcoming and friendly," Noroc says.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

So far, Noroc has been to around 50 countries. Here, a woman smiles in Omo Valley, Ethiopia.

So far, Noroc has been to around 50 countries. Here, a woman smiles in Omo Valley, Ethiopia.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

She tries to capture each woman in her surroundings. This woman was snapped in Thorunn, Iceland.

She tries to capture each woman in her surroundings. This woman was snapped in Thorunn, Iceland.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

“I prefer to photograph natural faces, without a lot of make-up,” Noroc says. Here, a woman sits at a tea house in Istanbul, Turkey.

"I prefer to photograph natural faces, without a lot of make-up," Noroc says. Here, a woman sits at a tea house in Istanbul, Turkey.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

Noroc says this Ethiopian woman is a Muslim, but her best friend is Christian. “While traveling in Ethiopia in February, I admired the way Christians and Muslims got along,” she says. “But in the same country, there are dozens of terrible ethnic conflicts.”

Noroc says this Ethiopian woman is a Muslim, but her best friend is Christian. "While traveling in Ethiopia in February, I admired the way Christians and Muslims got along," she says. "But in the same country, there are dozens of terrible ethnic conflicts."

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

Noroc visited Kichwa, Ecuador in the Amazon Rainforest and took pictures of the women there.

Noroc visited Kichwa, Ecuador in the Amazon Rainforest and took pictures of the women there.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

She has been expanding her project to include a wider range and diversity of subjects, both old and young. This picture was taken in Bukhara, Uzbekistan.

She has been expanding her project to include a wider range and diversity of subjects, both old and young. This picture was taken in Bukhara, Uzbekistan.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

“In some countries I approach 10 women and maybe only one accepts,” she says. “In other places, everybody accepts.” This was in Maori, New Zealand.

"In some countries I approach 10 women and maybe only one accepts," she says. "In other places, everybody accepts." This was in Maori, New Zealand.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

“Usually, in Western countries, I’m never refused [when I ask to take a picture],” Noroc says. This woman poses in Harlem, New York.

"Usually, in Western countries, I'm never refused [when I ask to take a picture]," Noroc says. This woman poses in Harlem, New York.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

An Uzbek woman in Kyrgyzstan.

An Uzbek woman in Kyrgyzstan.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

Here, a Buddhist nun poses in Kathmandu, Nepal.

 Here, a Buddhist nun poses in Kathmandu, Nepal.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

Noroc photographed this woman in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia.

Noroc photographed this woman in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

This woman is a computer engineer from Cairo, Egypt.

This woman is a computer engineer from Cairo, Egypt.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

Traveling across the Java Sea in Indonesia.

Traveling across the Java Sea in Indonesia.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

Going to North Korea was like “stepping [onto] a totally different planet, with different rules,” Noroc says. This woman was photographed in Pyongyang, North Korea.

Going to North Korea was like "stepping [onto] a totally different planet, with different rules," Noroc says. This woman was photographed in Pyongyang, North Korea.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

This woman was spotted in Sofia, Bulgaria.

This woman was spotted in Sofia, Bulgaria.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

Noroc says this woman in Guangzhou, China, was on her way to the hospital with her mother and husband to give birth.

Noroc says this woman in Guangzhou, China, was on her way to the hospital with her mother and husband to give birth.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

A woman standing on a pier in the Baltic Sea, Finland.

A woman standing on a pier in the Baltic Sea, Finland.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

A painter, in her studio in Valparaiso, Chile.

A painter, in her studio in Valparaiso, Chile.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

A woman poses on the streets of Havana, Cuba.

A woman poses on the streets of Havana, Cuba.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

A ballerina displays her talent in Saint Petersburg, Russia.

 A ballerina displays her talent in Saint Petersburg, Russia.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

“For me, beauty is diversity, [it’s] what makes us unique,” Noroc says. “I also believe that beauty can teach us to be more tolerant.” Below, a woman in the streets of Iran.

"For me, beauty is diversity, [it's] what makes us unique," Noroc says. "I also believe that beauty can teach us to be more tolerant." Below, a woman in the streets of Iran.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

A young woman in Cape Town, South Africa.

A young woman in Cape Town, South Africa.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

A woman in Oxford, UK.

A woman in Oxford, UK.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

Wearing traditional dress in Otavalo, Ecuador.

Wearing traditional dress in Otavalo, Ecuador.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

“[In India] I photographed subjects from very different environments,” Noroc tells Tech Insider. “From poor women living in slums to Sonam Kapoor, one of the most popular Indian actresses.” Here, an Indian woman poses at a train station.

"[In India] I photographed subjects from very different environments," Noroc tells Tech Insider. "From poor women living in slums to Sonam Kapoor, one of the most popular Indian actresses." Here, an Indian woman poses at a train station.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

A young woman in Medellin, Colombia.

A young woman in Medellin, Colombia.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

“Many people tell me how the project changed the way they see beauty and diversity,” Noroc tells Tech Insider. A woman on the streets of Dushanbe, Tajikistan.

"Many people tell me how the project changed the way they see beauty and diversity," Noroc tells Tech Insider. A woman on the streets of Dushanbe, Tajikistan.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

But her project has received criticism for showing a narrow a definition of beauty. “There is also negative feedback sometimes, but you have to accept it, even if you find it unfair,” she says. Below, a redheaded woman posing in San Francisco, USA.

But her project has received criticism for showing a narrow a definition of beauty. "There is also negative feedback sometimes, but you have to accept it, even if you find it unfair," she says. Below, a redheaded woman posing in San Francisco, USA.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

“The internet can make you very popular but also very exposed to different opinions,” she says. “Which is not bad, in the end.” A blond woman outside a home in Latvia.

"The internet can make you very popular but also very exposed to different opinions," she says. "Which is not bad, in the end." A blond woman outside a home in Latvia.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

A Tibetan woman in the Sichuan Province, China.

A Tibetan woman in the Sichuan Province, China.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

A mother and her son pose in Australia.

A mother and her son pose in Australia.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

Noroc hopes to publish an Atlas of Beauty book after another year of traveling. This woman was photographed in Rio de Janeiro.

Noroc hopes to publish an Atlas of Beauty book after another year of traveling. This woman was photographed in Rio de Janeiro.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

“There is much more diversity in the world, waiting for me, and I love to discover it. It’s an infinite treasure,” she says. Below, a woman in Myanmar.

"There is much more diversity in the world, waiting for me, and I love to discover it. It's an infinite treasure," she says. Below, a woman in Myanmar.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

Noroc also traveled around her home country of Romania. Here, a ceramic art student in a workshop in Cluj, Romania.

Noroc also traveled around her home country of Romania. Here, a ceramic art student in a workshop in Cluj, Romania.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

Noroc plans to continue to travel the world with just her backpack and camera. Her next stop? Greece.

Noroc plans to continue to travel the world with just her backpack and camera. Her next stop? Greece.

Courtesy of Mihaela Noroc

You can follow her journey and view more of her work on her Facebook page as well as herInstagram and Tumblr accounts.

Bolivares: Brand Of The Americas

bolivares

Ah, sweats. Few things could be more perfect for lounging in year-round or even sporting to work. It’s true that over the past year designers have been slimming down the traditional sweatshirt and sweatpant down so you can now wear them outside the home or gym and even pair with a blazer. Yet who hasn’t run into that situation when all you really want is one timeless but stylish piece that flies with everything, feels so comfortable that you never want to take it off, and yet isn’t so precious you don’t want to get it dirty?

Introducing Bolivares, the knitted basics brand out of New York City. Sold exclusively online, the company makes sweaters, tees, tank tops, pants and shorts, but creates them out of luxurious cottons predominantly from Peru in brilliant color for a zesty Latin twist.

IMG_0184_b-1 (dragged)

“Fashion’s not just about style but personality,” insists Lucho Bolivares, who founded the company in 2010 after stints in club promoting. Deciding to pursue his passion for the fashion trade, he packed his bags for South America and lived in Peru and Colombia for six months to lay the groundwork for his business and get schooled in the craft of textiles. Today, Bolivares blends South American handcrafted techniques and fabrics with his native New Yorker’s street sensibility to create something casual yet luxurious and modern in feel, with color as one of its signatures.

IMG_0195

“I admire Alexander Wang, Phillip Lim, Yohji Yamamoto and even Marc Jacobs. These are all designers that are introducing good quality, whether it’s high-tech. But I’m just trying to do leisurewear that’s functional for the guy that’s on the move.

Those are the people I’m focusing on,” the designer explains, calling sweaters his go-to niche. “You can have the same fiber and yarn for three styles, but if you have a different stitch, it can behave differently. And you’re not feeling overdressed or underdressed when you wear a sweater.

Armando-green

” New for this season are exquisite knitted tank tops and shorts (above), printed tees in pastels, and lighter gauge knits with graphic elements inspired by New York; but as the designer hints, Bolivares will pick up more steam when it releases accessories including scarves and hats for the fall and opens its first store in Williamsburg, Brooklyn in September. Says Lucho, “I feel like we’ve all seen the same things from people. I just thought a Latin American fusion would be fresh.”

El Chapo’s (Shorty) long reach – How cocaine conquered the world

HE MAY be only little, but Joaquín “Shorty” Guzmán, who was captured in Mexico on February 22nd, is reckoned to have run a big criminal business.

Mr Guzmán, who spent 13 years on the run after escaping from prison hidden in a laundry cart, is said by prosecutors to have been the boss of the Sinaloa drug-trafficking organisation, reckoned to be the world’s largest.

“Cartels” such as Sinaloa have helped to create a global market for cocaine, whose active ingredient is grown only in remote parts of Bolivia, Colombia and Peru.

In recent years police have seized the drug in nearly every country in the world. Though its popularity shows signs of declining in some rich countries, emerging markets such as Brazil are developing a taste for the drug.

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