Tag Archives: Gazprom

Hungary suspends gas supplies to Ukraine

Darshava gas facility in Ukraine, man with manual wheel operating valve

Hungary’s gas pipeline operator, FGSZ, says it has suspended delivery of gas to neighbouring Ukraine “indefinitely”.

Ukraine has been receiving gas from Hungary, Poland and Slovakia since Russia cut off supplies to Ukraine in June in a dispute over unpaid bills.

Ukrainian state gas firm Naftogaz confirmed the stoppage, saying it was “unexpected and unexplained”.

FGSZ said it had acted to raise the flow of gas to Hungary, due to an expected increase in demand.

With winter approaching fears are mounting that Ukraine will be unable to heat homes and power industry without Russian gas.

Russian and Ukrainian energy ministers are meeting in Berlin for EU-brokered talks, aimed at heading off such a crisis.

Relations between the former USSR’s two most populous countries soured after the overthrow of Ukraine’s pro-Russian President, Viktor Yanukovych, in February.

Europe's pipeline network

Russia subsequently annexed the Crimea region from Ukraine and was accused of fomenting a bloody insurrection in two of its eastern provinces.

Earlier this year Gazprom and Russian President Vladimir Putin warned of consequences if EU member states went ahead with deliveries to Ukraine to replace Russian supplies.

Russia says EU states are contractually forbidden from re-exporting gas to Ukraine while Brussels insists that such “reverse flows” are legal.

‘Energy blackmail’

Hungary’s move came three days after a meeting in Budapest between the head of Russian gas giant Gazprom, Alexei Miller, and Hungary’s Prime Minister, Viktor Orban.

Prime Minister Orban has been critical of EU sanctions on Russia and has maintained a closer relationship with Moscow than his western European neighbours.

Gazprom CEO Alexei Miller (L) and Russian Energy Minister Alexander Novak wait for the start of gas talks between the EU, Russia and Ukraine in Berlin, 26 SeptemberGazprom CEO Alexei Miller (L) and Russian Energy Minister Alexander Novak wait for the start of gas talks between the EU, Russia and Ukraine in Berlin

Gazprom agreed on Friday to boost supplies to Hungary, Reuters news agency reports.

“Hungary cannot get into a situation in which, due to the Russian-Ukrainian conflict, it cannot access its required supply of energy,” Mr Orban said on Hungarian state radio.

European Commission spokeswoman Helen Kearns said on Friday: “The message from the Commission is very clear: we expect all member states to facilitate reverse flows as agreed by the European Council

“There is nothing preventing EU companies to dispose freely of gas they have purchased from Gazprom and this includes selling this gas to customers both within the EU as well as to third countries such as Ukraine.”

Naftogaz urged its “Hungarian partners to respect their contractual obligations and EU legislation”.

“Neither EU countries nor Ukraine should be put under political pressure through energy blackmail,” Naftogaz said on its website.

Russian warning

It is hoped that Friday’s talks will establish a basis for an interim deal over energy.

The deal could involve the EU buying enough Russian gas to safeguard Ukrainian and European supplies during the winter months, at roughly market prices, according to Reuters.

However, Russian Energy Minister Alexander Novak insisted in an interview published on Friday that re-exporting Russian gas to Ukraine is illegal and could lead to some EU states going without fuel shipments from Gazprom.

“We hope that our European partners will stick to the agreements,” he told Germany’s business daily Handelsblatt (in German).

“That is the only way to ensure there are no interruptions in gas deliveries to European consumers,” he said.

In June, Russia cut off all gas supplies to Ukraine after Kiev failed to settle its debt with Gazprom.

Gazprom had sought $1.95bn (£1.15bn) out of a total claim of $4.5bn.

The Russia company said Ukraine had to pay upfront for its future supplies.

The issue of gas supply has dogged relations between Russia and Ukraine since the break-up of the USSR, with Russia seeking new export routes for its gas which would bypass Ukraine. EU supplies have been hit twice in the past decade because of the dispute.

The Kremlin has been accused of using Russia’s leverage as a major gas supplier for political ends in its international relations.

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Putin’s Trump Card In Ukraine: Winter Is Coming

As Putin pushes Ukraine to bend to his will and allow greater independence to Russian-backed separatists in the country’s southeast, the Russian president holds a trump card: Winter is coming.

“I think that nobody thinks of [winter] anymore, except Russia,” Putin said on Sunday, according to The New York Times. “There are ways of helping resolve the issue. First, to immediately stop hostilities and start restoring the necessary infrastructure. To start replenishing reserves, conducting the necessary repair operations and preparing for the cold season.”

Geysar Gurbanov, a Rotary international world peace fellow currently at Harvard, recently explained the leverage that Putin has over Ukraine as the temperature drops.

“According to the U.S. Energy Information Agency, [Ukraine’s] primary energy consumption is fueled by natural gas (40%) and coal (28%),” Gurbanov writes in The Duke Chronicle. “With winter coming to Ukraine in less than four months and the coal mines located in the easternmost part of the country ravaged by conflict, Ukrainians will freeze in their homes as their gas supplies from Russia are depleted. Therefore, if the rebels fail to achieve their goal, Gazprom, Russia’s energy giant, will help Putin to win the war eventually.”

So Putin’s remark could be interpreted as a veiled threat signaling that if Ukraine’s army doesn’t back down against the separatists (and embedded Russian soldiers), then Moscow will use gas as a weapon.

In 2013, Russian gas accounted for half of the total gas consumed in Ukraine. On June 16, Russia cut off gas supplies to Ukraine over unpaid bills. Earlier this month, Gazprom said that Ukraine’s outstanding debt for gas supplies stood at $5.3 billion as of Aug. 1.

Russia has already said that Ukraine would have to prepay for future gas shipments unless Kiev begins payments on accumulated debts.

The EU is currently trying to broker a deal that would allow shipments to resume temporarily.

In any case, Putin has the upper hand as Ukraine’s gas reserves run out as winter sets in.

“Can Ukraine now survive without Russian gas? No, it can’t,” Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk said earlier this month, according to RIA Novosti. “How much Russian gas do we need to buy? About 5 billion cubic meters.”

Gazprom’s China contract offers no protection against low prices

Gazprom’s 30-year contract for gas supplies to China was based on an optimistic view of the oil market and offered no protection in the event of a prolonged period of low prices, the Russian company said on Monday.

The contract between the state-controlled Russian gas group and China’s CNPC was signed with much fanfare in May 2014, envisaging $400bn-worth of gas deliveries over 30 years in what Gazprom said was the largest contract in its history.

However, since then oil prices have fallen by more than 50 per cent, potentially imperilling the economics of the project, whose development cost Gazprom has estimated at $55bn.

Gazprom confirmed on Monday that the gas price under the contract with CNPC would be linked to a basket of oil product benchmarks.

Asked whether the contract built in protections to ensure that Gazprom would not make a loss in the event of a prolonged period of low oil prices, Pavel Oderov, a director at the company, said:

“We have registered high risk appetite for this contract and we do not envisage such an event.”

Ildar Davletshin, oil and gas analyst at Renaissance Capital in Moscow, said that if current oil prices persist, the project, named “Power of Siberia”, would probably be unprofitable for Gazprom.

Analysts estimate that the gas price implied by the contract was around $350/thousand cubic metres when it was signed; given the 50 per cent decline in oil prices since then

“it could be as low as $175/thousand cubic metres — clearly a lossmaking level”, Mr Davletshin said.

Separately, the Russian government is preparing to support the flagship project. According to a document published by the Kremlin on Monday, president Vladimir Putin ordered the Russian government to draw up by the start of September a

“comprehensive action plan to ensure government support for the construction of gas transport infrastructure, including the Power of Siberia pipeline”.

Gazprom said it had no current plans to request government support, but that such a step may be necessary in the future.

“It is possible that the situation could change, that sanctions could get worse or the quantity of projects may increase. I do not exclude that in the future a situation may arise when government support is required,” said Alexander Ivannikov, Gazprom finance director.

The comments came as Gazprom reported a net profit of Rbs382bn ($6bn) for the first quarter of the year, a 71 per cent increase from a year earlier in rouble terms but lower in dollar terms as the results were flattered by the fall in the Russian currency.

The company suffered a decline in sales to Europe, the most important source of its revenues, with sales volumes declining by 16 per cent from a year earlier to 39.1 billion cubic metres for the period January-March.

Prices in dollar terms also fell, down 23.7 per cent to $284.2/thousand cubic metres, as they followed oil prices lower.

The Russian economy ministry recently reported a 13 per cent drop in production for Gazprom for the first half of the year, and predicted that the company’s output would fall to a new post-Soviet low for the full year.

Gazprom has been hit by weaker demand in Europe driven by tepid economic growth and mild winters, combined with a significant loss of market share both in Ukraine, until recently one of its top markets, and at home in Russia, where it is under pressure from independent producers.

Russia getting on with World Cup job as FIFA fights scandal

ST. PETERSBURG, Russia (AP) — As he shared the stage with FIFA’s departing president Sepp Blatter, Russian President Vladimir Putin’s message was simple. FIFA may be in chaos, but Russia is getting on with the job.

“I’d like to emphasize again that all the plans to prepare for the World Cup will be fulfilled,” Putin said, standing alongside the embattled Blatter at Saturday’s preliminary draw for the 2018 tournament. “Hosting it is one of our key tasks.”

Against the backdrop of Swiss authorities investigating how the 2018 World Cup was awarded to Russia, the draw was held in St. Petersburg, both Putin’s home town and the site of the most troubled of all the 12 World Cup stadiums.

For years, the construction of St. Petersburg’s 68,000-seat arena — due to host a semifinal in 2018 — was a costly, repeatedly delayed symbol of Russian state inefficiency, so bad that Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev publicly said it looked “disgraceful.”

Finally, almost a decade after construction began, it is close to completion. Estimated at 75 percent ready by project chief Vitaly Lazutkin, much of the remaining work is focused on installing seats and finishing off complex systems such as the retractable roof and movable pitch.

The final stages of the St. Petersburg build coincide with optimism that the 2018 World Cup, while beset by controversies over corruption allegations and racism by fans, will at least avoid the construction chaos that marred preparations for last year’s tournament in Brazil.

FIFA's President Blatter addresses next to Russia's President Putin during the preliminary draw for the 2018 FIFA World Cup at Konstantin Palace in St. Petersburg

It’s a “relaxing situation,” FIFA general secretary Jerome Valcke, who expects to leave office in February along with his longtime boss Blatter, told journalists Friday.

“Russia is really way on track and I have no concern. The next FIFA secretary general should be happy with the work that I give him because he will have a very organized World Cup.”

Russia getting on with World Cup job as FIFA fights scandal

The Petersburg stadium, provisionally titled the Zenit Arena, is set to cost 38 billion rubles ($650 million). Until the ruble dropped sharply in value last year against the backdrop of international sanctions and a low oil price, the same ruble budget was worth over $1 billion, which ranked it among the most expensive football stadiums in history.

Originally planned as a 45,000-seat arena by Zenit St. Petersburg’s owner — the Russian state-controlled company Gazprom — Russia’s successful bid to host the World Cup brought problems. Hosting a semifinal required an increase in capacity to 68,000, sending the partially-built project back to the drawing board.

FIFA, Blatter get back to World Cup business at Putin home

“The main problem that delayed the construction was that the stadium was redesigned three times,” project director Lazutkin said Monday. “That required quite a long time for redesign work and also for rebuilding the stadium.”

Since a Soviet-era stadium on the site was demolished in 2006, the Zenit Arena project has seen not only cost rises, but fraud investigations into subcontractors, the death of Japanese architect Kurio Kurosawa and political disputes.

MOS07. St.petersburg (Russian Federation), 25/07/2015.- Russian President Vladimir Putin (L) and FIFA President Joseph Blatter (R) attend the Preliminary Draw of the FIFA World Cup 2018 at Konstantinovsky palace outside St.Petersburg, Russia, 25 July 2015. St.Petersburg is one of the host cities of the FIFA World Cup 2018 in Russia which will take place from 14 June until 15 July 2018. (Rusia) EFE/EPA/MAXIM SHIPENKOV

Now the stadium’s roof has been fitted and work is under way to put in the seats, Lazutkin says the first games could be held in little more than a year’s time.

Calling the stadium “disgraceful” is no longer possible, he insists, adding: “Mr Medvedev said that earlier. Now he has a different opinion, as far as I know.”

One of Russia’s 12 World Cup arenas is raising concerns, however. Construction is fully under way at every stadium but the one in the western exclave of Kaliningrad, near the Polish border.

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That stadium was caught in a political tug-of-war between the regional and federal governments over its location. By the time the regional authorities’ costlier plan to put the stadium on an island prevailed, precious time had been lost.

The stadium’s design has only been signed off by a federal architecture watchdog in recent days, allowing work to begin. Worries over the stadium lying empty after the tournament also led to a cut in capacity by 10,000 seats to 35,000. Organizers say the reduced size will allow construction workers to make up for lost time.

“We have absolutely no doubts that the stadium will be ready on time and that everything will be up and running there soon,” organizing committee CEO Alexei Sorokin said Monday.

With less than three years to go until the tournament, Russian government revenues have contracted sharply under pressure from the low oil price, meaning that organizers are keen to save money.

A fall in the value of the ruble has meant organizers are swapping costlier imported materials and equipment for cheaper local alternatives, while many hotels and some infrastructure projects have been cut from Russia’s plans, reducing the total budget to 631.5 billion rubles ($10.8 billion).

The reason for removing the hotels, organizers say, was fears that luxury establishments could end up lying empty after the World Cup.

Sports Minister Vitaly Mutko said Friday that one of Russia’s main problems is that organizers don’t always know who to talk to at a rapidly-changing FIFA. At a time when officials are in custody and Blatter due to leave, Mutko said communication is “somewhat thwarted.”

EU poised to unveil antitrust charges against Russia’s Gazprom

A gas storage site in Ukraine on the natural gas pipelines linking Russia and the EU

Brussels will on Wednesday accuse Russia’s Gazprom of illegal abuse of its dominant position in Europe’s gas market, unveiling antitrust charges that threaten to inflame already difficult relations with Moscow.

Just a week after confronting Google over its market power, Margrethe Vestager, the EU competition chief, is pressing forward with a longstanding Gazprom case all but frozen by the Ukraine crisis, according to two people familiar with the situation.

The decision to send a formal statement of objections is a gamble for the European Commission.

The commission has always insisted that it is treating Gazprom as it would any other company operating in Europe, despite the geopolitical implications such a case could have. Russia sees the probe as a political weapon.

Since launching the biggest antitrust raids ever mounted in Europe in 2011, the commission has honed a case around concerns that focus on whether the Russian company thwarted competition and pushed up prices in central and eastern Europe.

Although the charge sheet has been ready since last year, Brussels held off amid fears that it could antagonise an increasingly belligerent Moscow and prompt a response, such as a gas cut-off, that dwarfed the overcharging issues the commission is trying to address.

Some people familiar with the case think Ms Vestager may seek to narrow the focus of the investigation, as she did in the charge sheet sent against Google last week.

The competition commissioner is expected to announce the decision on Wednesday. The commission declined to comment.

Gazprom told the commission this month that it wanted to renew settlement talks, which made limited progress before coming to a halt last year as the Ukraine crisis erupted.

Given its interest in reaching an accord over the concerns, any decision to unveil charges is likely to be seen by Moscow as a provocation.

Some diplomats fear the move is out of step with the EU’s efforts to build on some signs of progress in Ukraine that followed the Minsk ceasefire accord.

Acting decisively against energy companies that harm rivals, block energy flows from one EU country to another, or threaten to close the tap can help deter others – Margrethe Vestager, EU competition commissioner

As the EU’s top competition authority, the commission has the power to levy fines of up to 10 per cent of Gazprom’s global turnover and impose changes to its business model.

Once a statement of objections is sent, Gazprom is given 12 weeks to respond and can call a hearing to make its defence. It would still be able to settle the charges.

Ms Vestager has previously made clear that she sees the Gazprom case as a commercial matter unrelated to politics.

She told a Washington audience last week that “consistent enforcement” of the competition rules was vital for Europe’s hopes of building an energy union.

“Acting decisively against energy companies that harm rivals, block energy flows from one EU country to another, or threaten to close the tap can help deter others,” she said.

There are three main pillars to the Brussels investigation: that Gazprom abused its market dominance in eastern Europe to overcharge, restrict the resale of its gas and block rival sources of supply.

One particular area of concern is the big price differences seen in Gazprom contracts, which link its prices to the cost of crude oil in long-term supply contracts.

Ukraine Conflict Forces Eastern States to Stockpile Gas

Eastern European nations from Poland to Serbia are boosting stockpiles of natural gas after Russia reduced deliveries during the armed conflict in eastern Ukraine and concerns rose about a winter shutoff.

Underground storage in the Czech Republic and Poland is at full capacity, while Slovakia expects to top up its storage facilities in the next several days, the countries’ gas companies said. Serbia, whose sole depot has a capacity of 450 million cubic meters, may ask neighboring Hungary to store as much as 200 million cubic meters of gas in its reservoirs, according to Energy Minister Aleksandar Antic.

While the level of eastern European countries’ dependence on Russian gas through Ukraine varies, the region as a whole relies more on deliveries from OAO Gazprom (OGZD) than western Europeand is therefore stocking up in case flow from Russia via Ukraine stops entirely.

During the past few days, Russia began slightly reducing supplies to countries like Slovakia and Poland, which provide reverse gas flows to Ukraine.

“Only Latvia has enough storage capacity to survive through the winter without Russian gas,” Mikhail Korchemkin from East European Gas Analysis said by e-mail. “Other countries of central and eastern Europe don’t have enough storage capacity.”

Southeastern European nations such as Bulgaria and Serbia are particularly exposed to interruptions since they are almost 100 percent dependent on Russian gas coming through Ukraine. The current crisis has rekindled memories of 2006 and 2009, when Gazprom disputes with Ukraine left the Balkan nations without fuel for weeks.

South Stream

As a result, southeastern Europe’s governments were long reluctant to halt preparatory work on Gazprom’s South Stream project, designed to run under the Black Sea from Russia and enter the EU in Bulgaria, bypassing Ukraine.

Authorities were betting on the 2,446-kilometer (1,520-mile) pipeline to boost the security of supplies and halted the construction under lobbying from Brussels and the U.S. earlier this year.

The U.S. expanded sanctions against Russia today to include the country’s largest bank, OAO Sberbank, as well as energy, defense and technology companies owned by the state. Treasury Secretary Jacob J. Lew warned of Russia’s growing “economic and diplomatic isolation.”

In Serbia, where hundreds of thousands of households rely partly or completely on electricity for heating due to capped electricity prices, a gas shortage could cause a spike in power consumption that would destabilize the national grid, former Energy Minister Petar Skundric said. In case of a cutoff, Serb storage may cover as much as 45 days of consumption in wintertime.

Full Capacity

The Czech Republic’s gas storage is full, one month before schedule, according RWE AG (RWE), which operates 92 percent of the country’s underground storage with a capacity of 2.7 billion cubic meters. Polish utility Polskie Gornictwo Naftowe i Gazownictwo SA also filled its 2.6 billion cubic meters of to the limit.

Still, gas companies across eastern Europe are reporting reduction in gas supplies from Russia. PGNiG said it received as much as 24 percent less gas from Gazprom than it ordered on Sept. 8 and 9.

Slovakia, which started the reverse flow to Ukraine at the beginning of September, saw a 10 percent decrease in the amount of gas ordered from Russia every day since Sept. 10, operator Slovensky Plynarensky Priemysel AS said. Gas flow to Romania was cut by 5 percent.

Emerging Europe

“We are seeing a similar story across emerging Europe – Poland, Slovakia, Hungary and Romania, as Russia tries to limit any surplus gas available in the region for reverse flow back to Ukraine,” said Timothy Ash, the chief economist for emerging markets at Standard Bank Group Ltd. in London.

Slovakia’s SPP said so far the supplies are sufficient to cover all of the country’s demand and the storage is almost full.

Gas supplies to Austria were also 15 percent lower than agreed yesterday and will remain at the same level today, OMV AG spokesman Robert Lechner said in a phone interview today. The Austrian oil company is getting more gas than what’s needed and its own gas storages are 98 percent full, Lechner said.

The Czechs are less dependent on the supply of gas via the pipeline than surrounding countries because of its interconnection with Germany, which can cover their entire consumption.

The country is also able to supply neighboring Slovakia, a former federal partner, in case it’s needed, Czech Industry and Trade Minister Jan Mladek said.

Baltic Supplies

Lithuania has enough gas reserves to last until its new LNG terminal in Klaipeda opens in December, Prime Minister Algirdas Butkevicius said on Sept. 11.

Latvia’s Incukalns storage facility is 70 percent full, with enough gas to last the country for more than a year, Prime Minister Laimdota Straujuma said on Sept. 9.

Estonia, the smallest of the three Baltic republics, has gas stocks for only five days. While gas represents only 9 percent in the nation’s energy mix, it is used to heat 58 percent of the capital Tallinn.

Romania has a sizable domestic production and its storage with a capacity of 2.8 billion cubic meters is currently half full. The country can last about six months without any gas imports from Russia, Energy Minister Razvan Nicolescu said in June.

“Without Ukrainian transit, Bulgaria would suffer the most,” Korchemkin said. As for LNG potentially imported by Lithuania andPoland, it “would replace just about 25-30 percent of the daily volumes of Russian gas delivered via Ukraine.”

Hungary-Russia nuclear power deal faces Brussels roadblock

Hungary’s deal to award up to €12bn in nuclear power contracts to a Russian state-owned company is facing a growing threat from EU regulators who have the power to block the project.

A veto or prohibitive fine from Brussels would be a bruising setback for Viktor Orban, Hungary’s prime minister, who has made the project the centrepiece of his strategy to forge deeper political and economic ties with Russia, despite the ostracising of Moscow by the west over Ukraine.

Opponents of the deal say it both carries financial risks and deepens Hungary’s energy dependence on Russia.

The country already relies on Russia for 80 per cent of its oil and 60 per cent of its gas imports.

Budapest awarded contracts to design, build and maintain two 1,200 megawatt reactors in the town of Paks, 75 miles south of Budapest, to a subsidiary of the Russian atomic energy company Rosatom in December.

But the decision to conceal some details of the contracts on grounds of national security provoked suspicion among Mr Orban’s critics and in Brussels.

Although the European Commission did not raise objections to an intergovernmental agreement signed by the two countries just over a year ago, the award of contracts for the Paks plant has thrown up thorny competition concerns.

Two EU agencies are now examining the agreements. Euratom, the nuclear watchdog, is withholding approval for the plant’s fuel supply on technical and financial grounds, though talks are ongoing, said one official briefed on the matter.

All nuclear fuel supply deals by EU member states must receive the green light from the agency.

Competition investigators from the European Commission are also looking at state subsidies and the legality of contracts awarded to Rosatom and its affiliates without a tender.

The probe into the how the nuclear contracts were procured — described as a possible case of violation of EU law by officials — is still at an early stage, giving Hungary an opportunity to strike a bargain with Brussels before a possible full formal investigation.

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The battle of wills is part of a broader struggle between EU technocrats and Russia over Europe’s energy security.

Last year, Moscow scrapped its $50bn South Stream gas pipeline into eastern Europe after EU regulators said Gazprom, Russia’s gas export monopoly, would break competition rules by both supplying the gas and owning the pipeline.

For EU diplomats, Mr Orban’s decision not to hold a competitive tender underlined fears that his close links with Moscow could lead Hungary to resist attempts to ramp up sanctions against Russia.

On an official visit to Budapest last week, Vladimir Putin, Russia’s president, confirmed that Moscow would finance 80 per cent of the project’s total costs, saying he attached “great importance” to it.

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Politicians from Hungary’s green LMP party, who have launched legal challenges to the project’s secrecy in a Budapest court, warned that Paks would be an expensive mistake.

“We would like to see our country break free from Russian energy dependence, while Mr Orban seems to be seriously addicted to it,” said Bernadett Szél, the party’s co-leader.

Yet in a sign that Budapest was prepared for a confrontation with Brussels on the matter, Mr Orban declared last week that energy policy was a sovereign matter: “We will have a major problem . . . I expect an escalating conflict.”

A Hungarian government spokesman said the commission was trying to interfere in national energy policy “by stealth” and warned that attempts by Brussels to build a single internal energy market threatened EU member states’ sovereignty.

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