Tag Archives: Angela Merkel

Putin, Poroshenko talk on phone, – Kremlin

The conversation was held in the framework of telephone negotiations between the leaders of the Normandy Quartet on the situation in Donbas

President of Russian Federation Vladimir Putin held a telephone conversation with German Chancellor Angela Merkel, French President Francois Hollande and Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko.

Continue reading Putin, Poroshenko talk on phone, – Kremlin

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Germany owes NATO ‘vast sums’: Trump

US President Donald Trump unleashed a diatribe against Germany on Saturday, saying Berlin owes NATO “vast sums of money” and must pay the United States more for security.

His latest tweetstorm comes a day after he met German Chancellor Angela Merkel in Washington, where the two leaders showed little common ground over a host of thorny issues, including NATO and defense spending.

“Germany owes vast sums of money to NATO & the United States must be paid more for the powerful, and very expensive, defense it provides to Germany!” Trump tweeted on Saturday morning.

He prefaced his statement by lashing out at the news media. “Despite what you have heard from the FAKE NEWS,” he tweeted, “I had a GREAT meeting with German Chancellor Angela Merkel.”

Continue reading Germany owes NATO ‘vast sums’: Trump

Germany manhunt: ‘IS link’ to bomb suspect Al-Bakr – police

German police say a Syrian man arrested after a two-day manhunt probably had links to so-called Islamic State (IS).

Jaber al-Bakr, who arrived in Germany as a refugee, was detained in a flat in the eastern city of Leipzig early on Monday. He had been tied up there.

He had sought help from another Syrian, who alerted police after letting Mr al-Bakr sleep at his flat, reports say.

Continue reading Germany manhunt: ‘IS link’ to bomb suspect Al-Bakr – police

Hungary’s Orban: Migrant crisis is German, not European problem

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban insisted Thursday the migrant crisis was a German problem, not a European one as he defended his government’s handling of thousands of refugees flooding into his country.

“The problem is not a European problem, the problem is a German problem,” Orban told a press conference with European Parliament President Martin Schulz in Brussels.

“Nobody wants to stay in Hungary, neither in Slovakia, nor Poland, nor Estonia. All want to go to Germany. Our job is just to register them.”

Orban’s comments came as hundreds of refugees and migrants stormed a train at Budapest’s reopened main international railway station, which has become a flashpoint for people trying to head to western Europe via Hungary.

“We have clear cut regulations at the European level. German Chancellor (Angela Merkel) … said yesterday that nobody could leave Hungary without being registered,” he added.

“If the German chancellor insists that we register them, we will, it is a must.”

Orban has taken a consistently hard line on the migrant crisis engulfing Europe, refusing to accept an EU plan for compulsory quotas for asylum seekers and building a razor wire fence along the border with Serbia in a bid to halt the influx.

Syrian refugees and migrants walk along a railway line as they try to cross from Serbia into Hungary...

Syrian refugees and migrants walk along a railway line as they try to cross from Serbia into Hungary near Horgos, on September 1, 2015

The fence has done little to stem the flow and Hungary remains a key arrival point for tens of thousands of migrants entering the European Union, with some 50,000 arriving in the country in August alone.

Orban was due to hold talks with European Commission chief Jean-Claude Juncker and with EU president Donald Tusk, who warned earlier Thursday that divisions between EU member states threatened to scupper efforts to find a common response.

Schulz also warned that the 28 member states had to act as one.

“The European idea is of solidarity; what we see at the moment is egoism and to my mind, this is a real threat to the EU,” he said.

More than half of Germans support Angela Merkel’s tough stance on Greece

A Spiegel márciusi, botrányos címlapja, amin arra utaltak, hogyan látják Németországot Európában

A poll conducted in Germany has found that more than half of Germans agree with Chancellor Angela Merkel’s position on negotiations with Greece.

And almost all of those surveyed said that they doubted whether Greece would actually implement the sweeping reforms, which were agreed upon during marathon all-night negotiations between Eurozone leaders on Sunday night.

The survey, conducted by German polling company Forsa for weekly news magazine Stern, asked 1,001 people about their opinions on Merkel’s approach to the Greek crisis.

55 per cent said they believed Merkel’s tough attitude to Greece during the negotiations was correct, and almost one third wished that she had taken a much tougher line, by forcing Greece out of the Eurozone.

Only 14 per cent of respondents believed that Greece would actually implement the reforms, which include privatisation of the national electricity network, heavily boosting tax revenue and slimming down the generous pension system – the kind of austerity measures that 61 per cent of Greeks voted against in the referendum on 5 July.

81 per cent said they had serious doubts that the long list of major reforms would actually be implemented.

Oddly, Merkel found high levels of favour amongst supporters of Germany’s Green Party, one of the parties in opposition in the German parliament, the Bundestag.

Two-thirds of Greens said they supported her position – a similar figure to the level of support over the Greece issue within her own Christian Democratic Union party.

While other major Eurozone countries, such as France, presented themselves as allies of Greece in the run-up to the negotiations, the German delegation took a noticeably hard line, pushing for a set of major economic reforms, with finance minister Wolfgang Schäuble putting forward the suggestion that Greece could temporarily leave the Eurozone if the measures were not put in place within a strict timetable.

Reaction in Germany appeared mixed. Some Germans, as evidenced by the poll, backed the tough measures. Others thought they were overly harsh, and amounted to a German effort to humiliate and punish Greece, with major German paper Der Spiegel claiming that over the weekend’s negotiations,

“the German government destroyed seven decades of post-war diplomacy on a single weekend.”

Others criticised the fact that there was a deal in the first placed – the front page of Germany tabloid Bild, the day after the election, carried the headline:

‘Merkel saves Greece with our money’. The paper said that Greece will never pay back its third bailout, which must be voted on in European parliaments before it goes ahead.

Greece and all of Europe are in uncharted waters

alex tsipras angela merkel
German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras during Tsipras’ first official trip to Germany in March

Greece has voted “No” to its international creditors’ bailout proposal, supporting the left-wing Syriza Government in a high-stakes referendum.

The Sunday poll, in which Greece voted “No” to its international creditors’ bailout proposal, showed a clear rejection of creditor terms: 61% voted “No,” and just under 39% voted “Yes.” What this result will mean politically, however, is a rather more open question.

One reason has to do with the main actors of the German elite who seem to have presented a conflicted and confused response to the result.

For instance, the German Vice Chancellor Sigmar Gabriel told the Tagesspiegel newspaper that “the Greek Government is leading the Greeks on a path of bitter sacrifice and hopelessness.”

Yet Germany’s hardline finance minister, Wolfgang Schaeuble, stated rather surprisingly that Greece could exit the eurozone “temporarily.”

Similar cautious remarks were also reiterated by the German foreign minister Frank Walter Steinmeier, who stated in Tagesspiegel am Sonntag that a Grexit would be a “disastrous signal to countries outside the European Union.”

Angela Merkel on her part made no public statements, yet her awareness of the negative geopolitical consequences of a Grexit is well-known.

The Chancellor is also aware of the fact that a Grexit will end the dream that eurozone membership is irrevocable. But again, how Germany’s leadership especially Angela Merkel will respond is still a puzzle, despite the Chancellor’s track record on managing the passing of unpopular legislation.

This last point is especially relevant in case Greece requires a new bailout.

But there is another reason behind the uncertainty. If Greece exits the euro, it will most likely be what the Economist Intelligence Unit calls a “de facto” exit as opposed to a de jure exit.

A de facto exit means that a “No” vote would increase the likelihood of Greece defaulting on the ECB on July 20th.

Greece would then be cut off from the ECB’s ELA program, default on private creditors, and issue a parallel currency which will circulate alongside the euro.

With an increasing need to print domestic scrip, Greece will have exited the monetary union, at least in de facto terms.

Such a scenario can be reversed, since it is up to the Greek government to set a conversion rate between the euro and the scrip and re-denominate contracts. Consequently, whether Greece will be in or out of the euro will be an open question.

Yet the uncertainty does not end here. Even if a de facto exit occurs, Greece would continue to be legally (de jure) a member of EMU, and may face significant uncertainty over its status.

This is due to the fact that the nation could use treaty provisions to argue that it was illegally forced out of the euro by its peers, while its peers could accuse Greece of violating treaty provisions by issuing a parallel currency.

Consequently, the legal debate will be protracted and its outcome will be highly uncertain, to say the least.

In conclusion, if there is one concept that sums up the road ahead for Greece and Europe it is that of uncertainty. The latter is even more true due to the current polarized nature of Greek politics.

Such polarization will embolden the radical voices within Syriza to harden their stance towards Tsipras, and by consequence his stance towards the creditors.

Greek debt crisis: Deal is almost done, says finance minister Varoufakis

Greek Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis speaks to media earlier in the year.

A bailout deal between Greece and its creditors is almost finalized, Greek Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis said Friday, hinting that the two sides have been holding private discussions this week.

No matter what the result of Sunday’s referendum, an agreement is “in the offing”, Varoufakis said, speaking on RTE’s “Morning Ireland” radio show on Friday. If Greeks vote “yes”, the government will accept the proposal put forward by its lenders last week, he said, RTE News reported.

“If it is a ‘no’, I can assure you that on this week of impasse, we’ve had some very interesting proposals coming from official Europe confidentially, and a deal is more or less done,” Varoufakis added, the report said.

Greeks go to the polls Sunday to vote in a referendum on whether to accept reform measures put forward by Greece’s international creditors — the International Monetary Fund, the European Central Bank and other eurozone countries — in a bailout proposal last week.

Officials across Europe have characterized the referendum as a vote on whether Greece should stay with the euro, and a “no” result would present the European Union with the biggest challenge in its history. Read: Know this about Sunday’s Greek referendum

Negotiations over Greece’s debt broke down last weekend after the country’s prime minister, Alexis Tsipras, announced the ballot. German Chancellor Angela Merkel and other eurozone leaders have said talks would not resume until after the vote was held.

But in the RTE interview, Varoufakis indicated private discussions had been going on this week.

Varoufakis’s comments contrast with earlier statements from European creditors, who have warned that a “no” outcome would all but scupper a new deal for Greece and would step up the chances of the country leaving the eurozone.

Both sides are waging a war of words to sway Greek voters with less than 48 hours to go until polls open, at 7 a.m. local time, or 12 a.m. Eastern Time.

In an interview late Thursday, Tsipras stepped up his push for a “no” vote, saying that would result in a new bailout agreement within 48 hours.

The tally in the referendum is expected to come in at around 9 p.m. to 11 p.m. local time, or 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Eastern Time on Sunday.

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